Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Raser (Radioactive Laser)

  1. Jan 17, 2009 #1
    Nice to meet all of you :smile:

    We know that laser is amplified light.

    There's possible if amplify the radioactive ray (alpha, beta, or gamma) with the same procedure like the laser mechanism? :confused:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 17, 2009 #2

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Gama rays are electromagnetic - like light - and could theoretically be amplified in the same way (though I suspect it wouldn't be practical due to the short wavelength).

    Alpha and beta radiation are particles and you can't amplify a particle.
     
  4. Jan 17, 2009 #3

    tiny-tim

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    Welcome to PF!

    Hi desert fox! Welcome to PF! :smile:
    Hi russ! :smile:

    Alpha particles are bosons, so why couldn't we amplify a beam of them in the same way? :confused:
     
  5. Jan 17, 2009 #4

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2015 Award

    Re: Welcome to PF!

    (1) Charge conservation.

    (2) How are you planning on creating a population inversion?
     
  6. Jan 17, 2009 #5

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    "Matter lasers" happen to be an active area of research, in the laser cooling / BEC research community:
    http://everything2.com/e2node/atom%20laser

    It isn't necessary to actually create particles, you just need to amplify the number of particles that are in a specific state, using an available reservoir of the particles.
     
  7. Jan 17, 2009 #6

    russ_watters

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I stand corrected!
     
  8. Jan 17, 2009 #7
    Just for fun, I searched through Wikipedia looking for the phrase "gamma-ray laser" and found a couple more exotic possibilities -- using excited nuclei in the place of excited atoms, or using positronium annihilation. It all seems very speculative, but possibly more practical than trying to apply the standard procedure to such short wavelengths.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laser
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induced_gamma_emission
     
  9. Jan 17, 2009 #8

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    On the other hand, this is cold, low-kinetic-energy matter being used for matter-lasers. Not what you typically find as radioactive decay products.
     
  10. Jan 17, 2009 #9
    Are the product of Gamma ray amplified more dangerous than the ordinary gamma ray?
     
  11. Jan 17, 2009 #10

    Redbelly98

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    If they existed, I imagine gamma rays from a gamma-laser would be more dangerous just as laser beams are more dangerous than ordinary light. Mainly because the energy would be more concentrated.
     
  12. Jan 18, 2009 #11

    Cthugha

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    The main problem is the lack of sensible mirrors in the gamma range.
    Free electron lasers however are able to produce light in the vacuum UV to soft x-ray range and even a bit beyond (see for example FLASH at the Desy in Hamburg). The drawback is that these lasers rely on self amplified stimulated emission, which uses just the emission of microbunched electrons going through an undulator once. Therefore the amplification is there, but the coherence time is very low.
     
  13. Jan 18, 2009 #12

    LURCH

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Low coherence time = short range / rapid dispersion?
     
  14. Jan 18, 2009 #13

    Cthugha

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Coherence time is defined by the inverse spectral width, so low coherence time means most of all, that the emission is spectrally rather broad as the coherence times can be as low as 0.3 fs.
    The temporal profile of the intensity will also show a lot of spikes. See for example the Desy-FEL page here for what the beam looks like: http://hasylab.desy.de/facilities/s...rotron_radiation_to_a_sase_fel/index_eng.html
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Raser (Radioactive Laser)
  1. Radioactive decay (Replies: 1)

  2. Radioactivity Question (Replies: 4)

  3. Radioactive iodine (Replies: 1)

Loading...