Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw retirements - the demise of network news?

In summary, with the recent retirements of traditional television network anchors and the rise of 24 hour news channels, the future of network news is uncertain. However, the technological revolution and availability of news on the internet has changed the way people consume news. The major networks may still hold some influence due to their established credibility, but their dominance is not what it used to be.
  • #1
Loren Booda
3,125
4
Will traditional television network (CBS, ABC and NBC) news survive the near-simultaneous retirements of their accustomed anchors and the continued restructuring of the information industry?
 
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  • #2
Let's hope not...
 
  • #3
It depends if this whole thing about wanting more information about the world will hold up. Its starting to be too much for a little 30 minute show every few days or every day to handle and i think the 24 hour channels will start taking up more market share. Dont think it has anything to do with the resignations though.
 
  • #4
Pengwuino said:
i think the 24 hour channels will start taking up more market share.
It's not like the 24 hour channels really do much more reporting on the world. They have hour or half an hour shows that all talk about the same hot topics, and they BS a lot about American politics, rarely getting into anything that doesn't directly involve the USA or Iraq.
 
  • #5
Not really. Durin the day there's a lot of financial stuff and during the morning there's a lot of BS woman news (the latest fashions, what's going on in over-paidwood, CA, what's the latest buzz on the Apprentice, etc etc).

Plus of course there's at least some meaningful debates on 24h news.
 
  • #6
I think it's just a sign of the technological revolution our society is continuing to go through. 30 years ago, if you wanted to know what was going on in the world, you either read the paper, listened to the radio, or watched TV. If you watched TV, you were limited to about 3 or 4 channels, and you could watch the news at 6 or 11pm.

The advent of cable and 24 hour news networks changed that a lot. Why wait until 6pm when you can just turn on CNN for a few minutes and get the same news any time you want it. Nowadays with the internet boom, you don't even need to watch TV to get the news anymore. There are so many news sites out there it's unbelievable. It's a good bet that anything significant going on in the world will be reported on the internet within a few minutes.

I think the only thing the major networks have going for them (at least in the near future) is the perception that since they're such large, well-established programs, they shouldn't be *too* biased and that they don't present things without at least a little research. This perception has been strained a bit lately (the Bush papers come to mind), but I think it's still widely held.

While I don't see the network news programs disappearing any time soon, I don't think they'll ever have the monolithic influence they used to enjoy.
 
  • #7
Demise? That's about the opposite of the way I would have characterized it. Perhaps with Rather's demise, some ethics will find their way into CBS.
 

Related to Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw retirements - the demise of network news?

What are some reasons for the retirements of Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw?

There are a few factors that may have contributed to the retirements of these network news anchors. Some possible reasons include their age and desire to step down from a demanding job, changes in the media landscape and the decline of traditional network news viewership, and the increasing competition and pressure from online news sources.

How have the retirements affected the landscape of network news?

The retirements of Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw have left a void in the network news landscape, as they were well-respected and influential figures in the industry. This has also led to a shift in the demographics of network news viewers, as younger generations may not have the same loyalty to these anchors and may turn to alternative sources for their news.

Will there be new anchors to replace Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw?

Yes, network news organizations have already brought in new anchors to fill the void left by these retirements. For example, CBS News replaced Rather with Katie Couric and NBC News replaced Brokaw with Brian Williams. However, it may be difficult for these new anchors to fill the shoes of their predecessors and establish the same level of trust and authority with viewers.

What does the retirement of these network news anchors say about the state of traditional news media?

The retirements of Rather, Jennings, and Brokaw can be seen as a reflection of the changing landscape of news media. With the rise of online news sources and social media, traditional network news has faced declining viewership and credibility. The retirements of these anchors may be seen as a symbol of the decline of traditional news media and the need for adaptation and innovation.

How have viewers responded to the retirements of these network news anchors?

The response from viewers has been mixed. Some have expressed sadness and nostalgia for the end of an era, while others have welcomed the change and the potential for new perspectives and voices in network news. However, it is clear that the retirements of these anchors have had a significant impact on the industry and its audience.

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