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RCC circuit

  1. Aug 11, 2015 #1
    • New member warned about posting with no effort
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    The switch is closed at the moment t=0 and initial capacitor voltages are V01 and V02. How to find capacitor voltage time dependencies for both capacitors.

    2. Relevant equations


    3. The attempt at a solution
    bezymjannyj-png.87168.png bezymjannyj2-png.87170.png
     
    Last edited: Aug 11, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 11, 2015 #2
    What have you tried till now ?
     
  4. Aug 11, 2015 #3
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Aug 11, 2015 #4
    I also think so, but my teacher's feedback:
    "Time constant and steady-state are OK but the whole solution not - when I substitute t=0 and I don't get V1(0) and V2(0).

    Steady-state may be found using charge conservation law. The difference between initial condition and steady-state decays exponentially in the 1st order circuit.

    So please make another (final) iteration."
     
  6. Aug 11, 2015 #5
    I think I see a mistake - you first use indefinite integration for ' i ' as a function of ' t ' .
    You don't use the limits correctly , i.e. , you don't subtract ' i ' at t = 0 .

    Correct this , and then we can check if some other error creeps up .

    Hope this helps .
     
  7. Aug 11, 2015 #6
    I did not quiet get it. What limits should I use: t and 0?
     
  8. Aug 11, 2015 #7
    Could you explain what my teacher wanted to say by: "the whole solution not - when I substitute t=0 and I don't get V1(0) and V2(0)" and "difference between initial condition and steady-state decays exponentially in the 1st order circuit"
     
  9. Aug 11, 2015 #8
    The first part - At t = 0 , by your solution , V1 is not equal to V10 , as given in the question . Same for the other capacitor's initial potential drop ( V20 ) .

    The second part - This means that q ( charge on any one capacitor at time t ) would be such a function that -

    q0 - q = k.ek1 , where k and k1 are some constants that will be found on solving entirely .
     
  10. Aug 11, 2015 #9
    Isn't there when t=0: V1(0)=V10? Because by calculation I get the same equation.

    Did you mean this? But answer doesn't change.
     
  11. Aug 11, 2015 #10

    Mark44

    Staff: Mentor

    @@lex@nder, please stop deleting the content of your posts. When other people have responded, deleting your posts makes it impossible to follow the discussion.
     
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