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Reading circuit diagrams

  1. Oct 28, 2005 #1
    urgent help needed

    http://www.physik3.gwdg.de/~rgeisle/nld/sbsl-howto.html
    Halway down that page is a circuit diagram. In the diagram wires dont lead to anywere(after the resister label R1 the wire doesnt go anywere), I dont that much about reading circuit diagrams but I know those wires attach to something. Could you please edit that drawing in paint and show were the wires connect? Thank you.

    here's another picture, I dont know if it's the same setup though, but it looks similar. http://www.geocities.com/hbomb41ca/sono.html
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 28, 2005 #2

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    If you mean the little inverted "T" symbols, those are ground connections. If you mean the things on the sides of the flask at the right, those are piezo elements.
     
  4. Oct 28, 2005 #3
    berkeman, I am just nosy, I know nothing:-) there is a resistor and one of the ends is not conected and I do not know can resistor be conected to ground? Thank you.
     
  5. Oct 28, 2005 #4
    Yes, the inverted T connections. Ground? What do I connect the wires to?
     
  6. Oct 28, 2005 #5

    ranger

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    Of course a resistor could be connected to ground.

    The resistor in that circuit is connected to ground. The wire does go somewhere Serj (it goes to ground).
     
    Last edited: Oct 28, 2005
  7. Oct 28, 2005 #6

    Danger

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    Thanks for posting this. I've never seen a ground drawn that way, and would have been baffled if I'd run across it in a schematic.
     
  8. Oct 28, 2005 #7
    You mean literally the ground? Also imhaving trouble finding resistors. I need a 1 Mohm resistor, 10 kohm, and a 1R resistor. They have to take 250 volts , or it might be 40V p-p. http://www.techmind.org/sl/#electric I cant find a site that sells resistor that can take that much and I dont know were I could find them locally (lowes?)
     
  9. Oct 29, 2005 #8
    ranger, thank you very much. I learn something.
     
  10. Oct 30, 2005 #9

    berkeman

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    Serj, um, no, not "the" ground like dirt or something. Ground in the context of electrical circuits means the return path. The oscilloscope and the audio amp have 3-prong plugs, and the 3rd prong connects to "safety ground" or "earth ground" in the power distribution system. Note that the outer conductor of the coax cables shown in the diagram are also connected to this return ground.

    You generally get resistors and other electrical parts at some kind of electronics store. Like Frys Electronics or Radio Shack here in Silicon Valley. Or you order them from someplace like digikey.com or Mouser.

    I didn't read the detailed description of the schematic, but stay the heck away from 250V, Serj. You don't sound like you have the background to be working with anything but low voltage (<= 42V usually). It looks like the output of the audio amp doesn't need to get above 40Vpp, so stay down there for now, okay? You could get hurt trying to learn about electronics and working with higher voltages.
     
  11. Nov 1, 2005 #10
    what is a 1R resistor?
     
  12. Nov 1, 2005 #11

    ranger

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    I guessing is a resistor with a value of 1 Ohm.

     
  13. Nov 2, 2005 #12
    http://www.techmind.org/sl/#electric I dont understand figure 3, the outer parts of the coaxial cable (from the transducers) are connected to eacother but dont seem to be connected to go anywere (it looks like only the inner core is connected to the transducers).
     
  14. Nov 3, 2005 #13

    berkeman

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    C'mon Serg, please get a clue here dude. How do I breathe a breath of air? What school do you attend, and why do they leave you with such fundamental questions?
     
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