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Rectilinear Motion

  1. Aug 3, 2011 #1
    I can't remember how to derive this equation...

    x(fluxion)
    a=acceleration

    x=a

    From that, how do we get->

    at^2+v+h

    I think it had to do with integration, but I can't seem to get it to match the above.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 4, 2011 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Hi BloodyFrozen! :smile:

    (try using the X2 icon just above the Reply box :wink:)

    I don't understand what you mean by "fluxion" or "x=a" :confused:

    Try starting with dv/dt = a (and dx/dt = v). :smile:
     
  4. Aug 4, 2011 #3
    My bad.

    Anyways, I think I got it...

    dv/dt = a
    v(t)=at+C1
    v0=C1

    v(t)=at+v0
    x(t)=at2+v0t+C2
    x0=C2

    Therefore,

    x(t)=at2+v0t+x0

    Since x0 is the position at t=0, he can just replace it as the original height.


    x(t)=at2+v0t+h0

    Correct?:rofl:
     
  5. Aug 4, 2011 #4

    tiny-tim

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    erm :biggrin:

    what happened to the 1/2 ? :rolleyes:
     
  6. Aug 4, 2011 #5
    Woops my bad

    1/2at2...:wink:

    In one of the calculus review books, it says it's -1/2at2... Why is it that?
     
  7. Aug 4, 2011 #6

    tiny-tim

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    i'll guess it's talking about something being thrown up

    so if v0 is positive, then the acceleration is negative
     
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