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Reflecting magnetic fields

  1. Jul 3, 2007 #1
    Are there any materials out there that can reflect magnetic fields, or can a twisted channel be formed for them to follow???
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 3, 2007 #2

    mgb_phys

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    Not reflect ( that I know of )
    There are materials that don't let magnetic fields through them ( superconductors or mu-metal ) and you can contain and direct a magnetic field in somthing like the soft iron core of a tansformer.
     
  4. Jul 3, 2007 #3

    berkeman

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    You can check out the different types of magnetic materials here:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_materials

    And yes, some materials attract magnetic fields, and others repel them.
     
  5. Jul 4, 2007 #4
    Like mgb_phys, examples of this is diagmagnetism which is a property of superconductors. It will repel any kind of magnetic field no matter what orientation. You can make it follow a twisted path. Like a twisted iron core for example, the magnetic field will go through the iron core, follow the twist, providing you also wound a coil around the twisted iron core following the twist
     
  6. Jul 4, 2007 #5

    berkeman

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    That's not quite accurate. A magnetic field will follow an iron core whether or not there is a coil around the core. An external magnetic field is attracted to the high-mu iron core, and then prefers to travel along inside it, as opposed to out in the air. That is the principle behind magnetic shielding, for example.
     
  7. Jul 4, 2007 #6
    Could a magnetic field possible be channeled to follow a certain path by other magnetic fields???
     
  8. Jul 4, 2007 #7

    mgb_phys

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    I wouldn't think so, at least not at realistic field strengths.
     
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