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Relative density of milk

  1. Apr 13, 2015 #1
    Why is milk with a higher relative density better than one with a lower one.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 13, 2015 #2

    Doug Huffman

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    it depends on your measure of better. Higher butter-fat content perhaps?
     
  4. Apr 13, 2015 #3

    DrGreg

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    In non-homogenised full-fat milk, the "cream" rises to the top. This implies denser milk has less fat.
     
  5. Apr 13, 2015 #4

    jbriggs444

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    You want a higher density of "Total Solids" or "Total Dissolved Solids". Those are going to have the effect of increasing the density of the milk fluid. For a given percentage of butter fat, more solids are better.

    Mind you, I'm no expert. I was barely paying attention to that part of the spiel the one time I toured a dairy operation. Google says that a hydrometer is used to measure total solids.
     
  6. Apr 13, 2015 #5
    Milk solids, not referring to fats, are being used in processed foods more and more. Higher milk solids also make for better nutrition in powdered milk.

    http://www.hoards.com/12feb25-solids-not-fat
     
  7. Apr 13, 2015 #6

    lisab

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    Could you define what you mean by 'better'?

    I'm not sure General Discussion is where this thread belongs, but I need to know what you're asking before I can move it to a more suitable place.
     
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