Relative speed: Horizontal distance travelled in a collision

In summary, the given conditions are a coefficient of kinetic friction of zero and a coefficient of restitution of e. A particle with mass m and initial velocity v collides at an angle theta with an infinite mass horizontal surface for a collision time of 0.2 seconds. The horizontal distance traveled by the particle during the collision can be calculated by taking into account the constant horizontal component of its velocity and ignoring the effects of the vertical component and coefficient of restitution.
  • #1
physicsfun
Given coefficient of kinetic friction is zero and the coefficient of restitution is e:

A particle of mass m, collides at an angle (theta), with speed v, onto an infinite mass horizontal surface.
Collision time is 0.2 seconds.

What is the horizontal distance traveled by the particle during the collision?
 
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  • #2
Since no horizontal force acts on the particle, the horizontal component of its velocity remains constant.
 
  • #3
Doc, thanks for your reply!
so, and since it's just horizontal velocity... we just have to take into account the horizontal initial component and the vertical and coefficient of restitution are irrelevant in this case then?
 
  • #4
That's what I would say.
 

1. What is relative speed in a collision?

Relative speed in a collision refers to the speed at which two objects are moving towards each other before they collide. It is the combined speed of both objects and is measured in units of distance per time (e.g. meters per second).

2. How is relative speed calculated?

Relative speed is calculated by finding the difference between the speeds of the two objects involved in the collision. This can be done by subtracting the slower object's speed from the faster object's speed.

3. Why is the horizontal distance travelled important in a collision?

The horizontal distance travelled is important in a collision because it determines the amount of force and impact experienced by the objects involved. The greater the horizontal distance travelled, the higher the force of impact and potential damage.

4. How does the mass of the objects affect relative speed and distance travelled in a collision?

The mass of the objects involved in a collision affects relative speed and distance travelled in two ways. First, objects with greater mass will have a greater relative speed due to their inertia. Second, objects with greater mass will travel a greater horizontal distance upon impact due to the force of their mass.

5. What other factors besides relative speed and distance travelled can affect the outcome of a collision?

Other factors that can affect the outcome of a collision include the angle of impact, the elasticity of the objects, and the presence of external forces such as friction or air resistance. These factors can impact the relative speed and distance travelled, and therefore the force and damage of the collision.

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