Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Relativistic collision

  1. Oct 6, 2008 #1
    a relaticistic particle collide with another rest particle. what is the maximum energy transmitted to the particle after collision?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 6, 2008 #2
    I guess that would be momentum times the speed of light - since you would have to re-define your particles if rest mass were transferred.

    Regards,

    Bill
     
  4. Oct 6, 2008 #3
    100%
    thats what happens when a photon is Absorbed
     
  5. Oct 6, 2008 #4
    How does that relate to relativistic particles that are not photons?

    Regards,

    Bill
     
  6. Oct 6, 2008 #5
    what is the maximum amount converted to heat or the maximum amount transferred to the other particle?
     
  7. Oct 6, 2008 #6
    I think the OP was fairly clear with respect to that.

    Regards,

    Bill
     
  8. Oct 6, 2008 #7
    well we just had a thread about the other so i thought i would ask. it seems rather trivial if he is asking how much is transferred.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2008 #8
    to the other particle.
     
  10. Oct 7, 2008 #9

    clem

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    There is a lot of algebra in solving this.
    The max energy to the target is when the projectile goes straight back in the cm system.
    First you have to find the cm momentum P and energy E of the target particle.
    Then change its momentum direction to go forward and LT P and E back to the lab system.
     
  11. Oct 12, 2008 #10
    yes.but I can't solve this problem by very much algebra. I don't reach any logic result.
    please give me a mathematic result.
     
  12. Oct 13, 2008 #11

    clem

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    Conservation of energy and momentum for the incident particle m rebounding backwards with momentum p, which transmits the most energy (assuming the target mass M>m), gives the equation
    [tex]E_L+M=\sqrt{p^2+m^2}+\sqrt{(p+p_L)^2+M^2}[/tex], where[tex]E_L[/tex] and
    [tex]p_L[/tex] are the incident energy and momentum.
    It is not easy to solve for p, but that is what one of us must do.
     
  13. Oct 14, 2008 #12
    why cant we just imagine that there is a massless spring between the 2 particles then go to a frame where the particles are both moving at the same speed? I would think that the answer would be obvious. unless I am missing something.
     
  14. Oct 14, 2008 #13

    clem

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor

    You are missing all the work involved.
    The spring is irrelevant.
    You seem to be describing my first suggestion to go to the cm system where the momenta (not the velocities) are equal in magnitude. Either method I proposed has some complicated algebra. But we all learned algebra in high school.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Relativistic collision
  1. Relativistic Collision (Replies: 3)

Loading...