Required Torque (Electromagnet stuff)

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In summary, the speaker is an ME working on a project with ME and EE team members involving oscillating a metal bar at high frequencies. They estimate that a minimum torque of 2.352 Nm and a minimum force of 58.824 N will be required. They are unsure if using induced currents is a reasonable approach and ask for help with determining the required voltage. They also mention the possibility of tuning the mechanical properties for resonance at 50Hz to reduce torque needs.
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minger
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Hi guys, I don't normally post in here as I am an ME. Anyways for a project, I am teamed up with a couple of ME, and some EE guys. We are working on a project that will involve oscillating a metal circular bar at quite high frequencies (50 Hz, I know that's not a lot for you guys, but we don't like to do stuff like that :-p) . From my calculations, minimum torque required will be at least 2.352 Nm, and from the size of the shaft, a minimum of 58.824 N of force will be required to accelerate the shaft quickly enough.

Now to the question, the electrical guys would like to accomplish this using induced currects and all that kind of jive that you guys do that I don't really understand so much. I guess my question is, is this a reasonable amount of torque and force to produce? The environment will be somewhat hot (~150-200°F at the most) and space will be somewhat limited. If this is indeed possible, how much voltage will be required?

I know I'm making a lot of broad questions, so if you would like to help, just make some general assumptions about things that I have left out. Thanks a lot, and I appreciate the help.
 
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TTT Any help please?
 
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Is there a chance to tune the mechanical part properties to have resonance at the desired frequency (50Hz)?
If you can do it - your torque needs would be reduced significally...
 

Related to Required Torque (Electromagnet stuff)

1. What is Required Torque and why is it important in electromagnetism?

Required Torque is the amount of force needed to rotate an object around a fixed axis. In electromagnetism, it is important because it determines the strength of the magnetic field produced by an electromagnet and its ability to perform tasks such as holding or moving objects.

2. How is Required Torque calculated in electromagnetism?

Required Torque can be calculated by multiplying the strength of the magnetic field (measured in Tesla), the distance between the magnet and the object, and the angle at which the object is being rotated.

3. Can the Required Torque of an electromagnet be increased?

Yes, the Required Torque of an electromagnet can be increased by either increasing the strength of the magnetic field or by decreasing the distance between the magnet and the object. Additionally, using a stronger and more efficient electromagnet can also increase the Required Torque.

4. What factors can affect the Required Torque of an electromagnet?

The strength of the magnetic field, the distance between the magnet and the object, and the angle at which the object is being rotated are the main factors that can affect the Required Torque of an electromagnet. Other factors such as the type and material of the magnet, as well as external forces, can also have an impact.

5. How is Required Torque used in practical applications?

Required Torque is used in a wide range of practical applications, such as in motors, generators, and magnetic levitation systems. It is also important in robotics, where precise and controlled movements are required. In industries, Required Torque is used to determine the strength and capabilities of electromagnets for tasks such as lifting heavy objects or separating magnetic materials.

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