1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Research analysis

  1. Sep 28, 2010 #1
    Research analysis....

    I want to know if there is a proper forum where amateur researchers can submit or discuss on their researches regarding physics or possibly communicate with professors and academics of top ranked universities,
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 28, 2010 #2

    fss

    User Avatar

    Re: Research analysis....

    You're probably better off just e-mailing a professor in your field of research directly. Unless you're part of a large collaboration (CERN, for example) there really is no clearinghouse for such discussion.
     
  4. Sep 28, 2010 #3

    eri

    User Avatar

    Re: Research analysis....

    There really isn't a forum like that that I'm aware of. Contacting someone is a good idea, but don't blindly email 100 people in the field you've never met. Either narrow it down to a few people doing similar work who might be interested (and not people like Hawking) or actually meet someone at a local university. You say in your profile that you're studying for a bachelors degree - just go talk to someone in your school in the appropriate department. If they aren't an expert in the field but think you might have something worth looking at, they'd be happy to put you in touch with someone in the right field.
     
  5. Sep 28, 2010 #4
    Re: Research analysis....

    I am basing my guidance on the assumption that you are an undergraduate, not in the physics program - according to your forum profile.

    DO NOT DO THIS. It seems like a reasonable thing to do, but it really isn't. Why? First, with the advent of email, people send their pet theories to professors all the time. Even as a grad student I would get these from people. Second, you don't have a sound grounding in physics. I read through your posts here and you are missing some very fundamental notions in physics. Consider that a bright and shiny new physics PhD has, on average, a decade of physics training. And you have maybe a few semesters? Third, professors are very busy. Especially during the semester- they have teaching on top of research to get done.

    I know this is harsh and may seem a little cruel. I am genuinely sorry for that, but it is best to be honest.

    What should you do next, if you are serious (or maybe even just semi-serious) is to do some self study or take some upper level physics classes. Maybe get a double major. Figure out what is already known out there and then see if your ideas still "hold water."

    EDIT: sorry forgot to add this: There is the independent research forum here at physicsforums.com. They have a special set of rules and criteria, but if you can follow the rules and meet the criteria, you should post there. It can be found here: https://www.physicsforums.com/forumdisplay.php?f=146
     
  6. Sep 28, 2010 #5

    fss

    User Avatar

    Re: Research analysis....

    I find this a bit sensationalist. The worst that can happen is it will be ignored. If the idea or question has merit, most professors would at least consider responding- especially if they have teaching responsibilities as opposed to being primarily in a research role.

    I don't meet many professionals in education unwilling to consider a well-constructed theory.

    However, I have not read through your posts as Norman has. If your idea is totally off the wall, consider thoroughly investigating yourself before you put your name on it. Or send it to an M-theorist.
     
  7. Sep 28, 2010 #6
    Re: Research analysis....

    How will he know if it is totally off the wall or not if he doesn't have the background in the subject already? Maybe my statement is a little sensational, but I have seen more than one office door decorated with crackpot emails.

    But if he is going to go through the effort to write the email up and bother a professor with it, why not first see if it passes the litmus test of the physicsforum independent research section?

    :tongue:
     
  8. Sep 28, 2010 #7

    fss

    User Avatar

    Re: Research analysis....

    As have I, but there is a difference between a crackpot theory and a genuine misunderstanding of the physics behind a particular theory. And I certainly wouldn't recommend pestering any individual for a response.

    I wasn't recommending against this- this is a good idea.
     
  9. Sep 28, 2010 #8
    Re: Research analysis....

    I would be afraid of someone stealing my ideas. :tongue2:
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook