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Resisitivity of Paper?

  1. Dec 28, 2006 #1
    Hi all,

    New here - have a Physics project and need to find a figure for the resitivity of standard writing paper.

    Any ideas?

    Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2006 #2

    ZapperZ

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    You need to find a "figure" for the resistivity of paper? What KIND of a figure?

    Zz.
     
  4. Dec 28, 2006 #3
    I'd start by finding the very thinnest possible leaf of paper, and sandwiching it between two electrodes with very great surface area. Any idea why?
     
  5. Dec 28, 2006 #4
    sorry for posting this in the wrong place.

    Zapper - We were told for research we needed to find an approximate value for the resistivity of paper so we can compare results from an experiment we are doing to the actual values...

    It is a bit confusing. I imagine it will be a fairly high value?
     
  6. Dec 28, 2006 #5
    Hello,

    What we have to do is design an experiment to find the resistivity of paper, easy enough.

    But to check our results we need to find the "official" value of what the resistivity of paper is.

    (The resisitivity is a constant and measured in Ohm Metres, Zapper)

    For example the resistivity of copper Copper 1.72 × 10-8 Ωm.

    I would imagine paper, as a fairly poor condutcor, would have a larger resistivity, but we dont know what...

    Any ideas?
     
  7. Dec 28, 2006 #6
    putting a paper in between electrodes?
    I remember my high school physics teacher doing this demo a while back and he ended up with a burning paper. :smile:
     
  8. Dec 28, 2006 #7

    ZapperZ

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    So by asking about a "figure", you mean you want a value, rather than a graph of some kind (what is normally refered to as a "figure")? Very confusing.

    What is wrong with just measuring it? It's not going to be easy because you probably need to use a rather thin strip of paper and a rather large potential difference to be able to detect any noticable current using standard lab equipment. Then you need to make an estimate of the cross-sectional area of that paper strip to be able to find the approximate resistivity.

    Good luck!

    Zz.
     
  9. Dec 28, 2006 #8

    disregardthat

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    Wouldn't that mean it has low resisitivity?

    ( :O is this a word: resitivititional, Five i's!)
     
  10. Dec 28, 2006 #9

    ZapperZ

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    Yes, I'm fully aware what "resistivity" means. I've measured it in myself in layered materials using the 4-point technique. I was asking for what "figure" that was being asked in the OP, if you notice.

    Zz.
     
  11. Dec 28, 2006 #10
    :shy:

    All we want is the numerical value / number / summin that looks like 1.xxx x10-x

    :smile:
     
  12. Dec 28, 2006 #11
    An order of magnitude value will be more than sufficient. Different types of paper will have different resistivities, try a google search.
     
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