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Resistance of a Wire experiment

  1. Oct 26, 2011 #1
    Hi,

    I have to come up with five limitations in my experiment in order to then explain them. This is the first time I do this, so some of my suggestions might seem absurd.

    The experiment was the following: I had a power pack connected to an ammeter in series, a nichrome wire, a voltmeter in parallel to the wire in question and a variable resistor to keep the current constant. Using crocodile clips, I altered the length of the wire, in order to investigate its effect on the resistance.

    The five limitations I have so far came up with (and please don't give away any if I haven't yet acknowledged it):

    1. The fact that, as the wire got shorter and therefore the resistance greater, I could not keep the wire from heating up

    2. The wire I was using had a tendency to wind up, diminishing my precision and accuracy in measuring the length

    3. My crocodile clips were slightly rusty, which could have affected its ability to conduct electricity

    4. I did not use ideal voltmeters and ammeters

    5. In the parallel branch linking the wire in question and the voltmeter could have had some resistance of which I could not account for

    Are those ok or not realistic?

    Thanks,
    Peter G.
     
  2. jcsd
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