Resistance of an element

  • #1
Hi All,

I have this clarification, if I have a resistor element of any value and if the physical length of the resistor is say L. Does the resistance of the element increases from 0 at the beginning to R at the end of the resistive element that is L, or it is the average, or it is located at one point, could somebody please explain me this? Similarly if a current I is flowing through the resistive element the voltage drop say Vr keeps increasing from 0 to the Vr at the end of the element or how it is?

Thanks in advance,
regards,
Satya
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
vk6kro
Science Advisor
4,081
40
It depends on the resistor, but if the resistance material is uniform, then this is true:

if I have a resistor element of any value and if the physical length of the resistor is say L. Does the resistance of the element increases from 0 at the beginning to R at the end of the resistive element that is L,

Wire wound resistors are similar, but the resistance increases in steps as you go from turn to turn. If you followed the wire all the way around the resistor, then the resistance increases as you go from one end to the other.

There are potentiometers of both types which allow you to connect to various ponts on a resistor and gradually change the resistance or the ratio of resistances..
 
  • #3
So can I say that a voltage drop across a resistor (by passing a current) is the sum of the small voltage drops within the resistor ?

Thanks in advance,
Regards,
Satya
 
  • #4
vk6kro
Science Advisor
4,081
40
Yes, you could say that.

The small parts of a resistor are just like having a lot of small resistors in series, so you could regard each of them as producing a small voltage due to the current flowing in it.
 

Related Threads on Resistance of an element

Replies
3
Views
4K
Replies
2
Views
605
Replies
27
Views
6K
Replies
21
Views
2K
Replies
11
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
12K
Replies
1
Views
3K
Replies
16
Views
2K
Top