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Resolution in degrees ?

  1. Mar 18, 2013 #1

    Femme_physics

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    Resolution in "degrees"?

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    In the following scheme we see the channels spreadout of an absolute coder with 5 bits that works on a regular binary code. What's his resolution in degrees?

    http://img705.imageshack.us/img705/475/01234v.jpg [Broken]



    3. The attempt at a solution

    I don't ever recall measuring resolution in degrees.

    However, I see the solution in the solution manual is just this: 360/25 = 11.25 degrees / bit

    My question is simple...where did he take the 25 from? I see the numbers range from 0 till 31... excuse the bad quality.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 18, 2013 #2

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

  4. Mar 18, 2013 #3

    Femme_physics

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    Thanks, Jedi, I'll ask my teacher on class Friday (it's his solution manual)
     
  5. Mar 18, 2013 #4

    jedishrfu

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    I saw an error like this in a popular math book the guy meant to say 2^5 but the copy-editor put in 25 and this may be the real source of the error you discovered.
     
  6. Mar 18, 2013 #5

    SteamKing

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    If you look at the picture, the values run from 0...31, which is 2^5

    Astronomers deal with resolution not so much in degrees, but in seconds of arc.

    3600 arc seconds = 1 degree.

    For resolutions in degrees, this suggests regulation of something like a stepper motor, which turns a fixed portion of an arc every time it is actuated.
     
  7. Mar 18, 2013 #6

    Femme_physics

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    The question didn't specify such fancy data :) But thanks for the input.

    It won't be the first time I approach teachers with errors, nor the first time I'll be submitting errors to solution manuals :-) Just ask username "I Like Serena", we used to do it a lot in mechanics! So, I trust the users of PF :)
     
  8. Mar 18, 2013 #7

    I like Serena

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    Nice observation.
    Note that 360/25=14.4, while 360/2^5=11.25.

    Oh, and happy birthday Fp!
     
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