Restaurant food: Healthier vs?

  • Thread starter Pengwuino
  • Start date
  • #51
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
16
Mk said:
Not many people have ever died of being too fat. I can't think of anyone immediatly. And no one I've ever met or heard of has been in the hospital for being too fat. Liposuction maybe...
I've heard of PLENTY of people who have been hospitalized for being too fat. Directly, you don't really die of being too fat... you die of the problems associated with being too fat. You die when you have a heart attack from overworking your heart, you die of diabetes, and im sure there are other things.
 
  • #52
Mk
1,984
3
Pengwuino said:
hearing a lot of Europeans and Canadians saying that they're going out "to have a drink" with friends or family for no real reason other then to chat and hang out where Americans would say "we're going out to grab a bite" for no real reason.
Crumpets and tea anyone?
 
  • #53
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
16
Mk said:
Crumpets and tea anyone?
If the people i know are going out to get tea, i'm not associating myself with them anymore :tongue2:
 
  • #54
2,985
15
Then don't talk to me. Tea is for the civilized gentleman.
 
  • #55
Monique
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,149
64
chroot said:
Everyone likes American restaurants.
Um, not really, I never liked them. Everytime that I went to an American restaurant, I came home with a doggy-bag that lasted me for two more meals. I did have to scrape all the solidified butter out of the bottom of the platter, where the food was swimming in. I don't know how they get away with it.
 
Last edited:
  • #56
Pengwuino
Gold Member
4,989
16
I just remembered something!

There was a poll taken a while ago and I remember it was about views toward obesity. It turned out that like 60% of americans weren't concerned with obesity because they expected science to have an answer for diabetes when they become older.
 
  • #57
253
0
Pengwuino said:
It's a choice that people make. Everyone seems to forget that there is indeed tremendous satisfaction in good food. What's the compromise? 50 years of incredible food vs. 10 years off your life (and realistically, you could be taking 0 years off if you actually get off your butt and excercise). There doesn't HAVE to be a compromise, it all just needs to balance out.
Yes there is tremendous satisfaction in food. I love food more than anything. When cutting I look forward to my cheatdays like a kid for christmas. But just like with everything there has to be discipline and restrain. Its fun to drink alcohole but everyone knows you shouldnt drink everyday. The same goes for crap food.

Excercise can not make up for a horrible diet. You can not burn several thousands of kcal through exercise each day. Maby 600-700 if you are active. Thats still just a serving of fries and burgers. Excercise can not totaly negate the horrible effects of high gi food either and it can do nothing about trans fatty acid.

People today are used to eating hamburgers, french fries and **** like that as food. Not as treats. They have becomed seriously addicted to crap food. Now the adults they know wtf they are doing so I dont care one bit about that. If they want to sacrifice there health and lifespan for burgers and candy go ahead.

But the kids, that is where the problem is. We are forcing these bad habits on a entire generation.
Parents to fat kids needs to take a good look at themself in the mirror and ask themself how they can ruin there own childs life like that even when they damn well know they are doing it. But most parents to fat kids just blames genetics, the tooth fairy, the school food and alien conspiracies.
 
  • #58
Monique
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,149
64
If a mother eats a lot of vegetables during breast feeding a baby, the baby gets used to the taste and will like vegetables more than a baby that was fed on bottled milk. It's not genetics, it's upbringing.

If someone serves me a plate overflowing with food, I'll likely eat half the amount that I'd otherwise would have eaten: the sight of it just puts me off when I know I wouldn't be able to eat it all. I'd never choose a restaurant just because they serve full plates, I like good food.

There was a time I went to a 'proper' American restaurant and ordered potatoes with white fish. I was expecting spicy potatoes with a nice lean piece of fish. I'd never ever expected they would serve me DEEP-fried sliced potatoes and three DEEP-fried fish, enough to feed an orphanage :surprised I probably ate a single chip and a bite of fish, after having scraped off the breading, until I turned to the dish of my friend who had some kind of vegetarian stew.
 
Last edited:
  • #59
Mk
1,984
3
Um, not really, I never liked them. Everytime that I went to an American restaurant, I came home with a doggy-bag that lasted me for two more meals. I did have to scrape all the solidified butter out of the bottom of the platter, where the food was swimming in. I don't know how they get away with it.
Mmmm, butter... I love American restaurants. I defiantly prefer them over European ones :yuck: However, upper-class Thai restaurants, I likey.

If a mother eats a lot of vegetables during breast feeding a baby, the baby gets used to the taste and will like vegetables more than a baby that was fed on bottled milk. It's not genetics, it's upbringing.[
/quote]
It sounds like a myth to me. Maybe I'm wrong?

If someone serves me a plate overflowing with food, I'll likely eat half the amount that I'd otherwise would have eaten: the sight of it just puts me off when I know I wouldn't be able to eat it all.
Hey, the fatter tend to eat the whole thing, the thinner tend to eat part of it now, and save for leftovers. I like Red Lobster. :biggrin:

I'd never choose a restaurant just because they serve full plates, I like good food.
This is the way you should go... unless you aren't willing to spend more than a buck. At McDonald's you can get a lot of cheap, fatty food. Or on the same budget, you could get half of an appetizer at a Red Lobsters or Olive Garden. Some of us have different values, or less money or both. That is why McDonald's prospers in America.
 
  • #60
Evo
Mentor
23,161
2,855
One restaurant meal will last me three days. I agree with Monique, the stuff is always swimming in butter. But I like butter. :redface:

Usually after eating the salad I'm full and can't even get to my entree, so I always end up eating it cold the next day. :eek:

The BEST food I've EVER eaten was in Sicily. Everything was to die for. Well, except that one pizza made out of cement. I could NOT cut into it, I tried hacking into it, tried chopping into it, I could not break the crust, then my boyfriend Antonio, native Sicilian, offers to help, he finally manages to break it and pieces go flying everywhere. He ended up sharing his with me. I really think the kitchen help heard I was American and did something to the crust.
 
  • #61
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,490
52
Evo said:
One restaurant meal will last me three days. I agree with Monique, the stuff is always swimming in butter. But I like butter. :redface:
I only think that's true with the "cheap" restaurants (not to say the prices are exactly inexpensive in them, but Outback and similar type restaurants are not a "fine dining" experience...they serve a steak for one that's larger than what we cooked to feed a family of 4 when I was still living home). As I mentioned before, if you go to a very nice restaurant, one known for quality of food, not quantity, you'll have a very different experience. Each course is rather small...sometimes it even looks funny to have just a few tiny slices of meat in the center of a huge plate. But, that's all you need if you're eating 5 or 7 courses, just a few bites from each course so that by the time you get to dessert and coffee, you can still savor it and walk away satisfied but not stuffed.

Usually after eating the salad I'm full and can't even get to my entree, so I always end up eating it cold the next day. :eek:
It USED to be a trick that they'd serve you a big salad so they could get away with a small main course (salad is cheap, beef expensive), since you were already full. I'm not sure when it switched that the chain restaurants started serving giant main courses and didn't stop serving the giant salad before it. If I'm going to a chain restaurant, I usually just skip the salad course unless it's included in the price of the meal, then I just nibble at it, but don't finish it...it's always iceberg lettuce anyway - might as well just have another glass of water for all the nutrition that provides.
 
  • #62
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,924
2,235
Apparently on average, Americans eat nearly twice as much as they should, and they eat too much refined grains, sugar and fat.

http://www.ers.usda.gov/publications/FoodReview/DEC2002/frvol25i3a.pdf [Broken]

Excercise can not make up for a horrible diet. You can not burn several thousands of kcal through exercise each day. Maby 600-700 if you are active.
It really depends on the excercise. Playing soccer or bicycle riding or swimming for prolonged periods can burn several thousand calories. However, most people do not engage in such activities.

Anyway, exercise does not make up for a bad diet.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #63
Monique
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
4,149
64
Mk said:
Mmmm, butter... I love American restaurants. I defiantly prefer them over European ones :yuck:
I always go for authentic asian restaurants, cannot go wrong there. I had the best classic chinese stew today in a restaurant, it came in a small bowl and I ordered a small bowl of soup with it. No big salads. Best thing I tasted in a while.
 
  • #64
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
34
Azael said:
You can not burn several thousands of kcal through exercise each day. Maby 600-700 if you are active.
Of course you can. Each day that I ride my bike to work (around a 32 mile round trip), I burn approximately 1400 kcal. When I'm pedaling as hard as I reasonably can, keeping a heart rate above 160 beats per minute, I can easily burn a thousand calories an hour. It's not that hard to burn off a thousand calories. I burn 50-70 calories per mile at 20+ mph.

I've done several 100+ mile bike rides and burned more 5,000 kcal for each one.

And yes, I'm using a heart rate monitor on the bike; I'm not just guessing.

- Warren
 
  • #65
253
0
chroot said:
Of course you can. Each day that I ride my bike to work (around a 32 mile round trip), I burn approximately 1400 kcal. When I'm pedaling as hard as I reasonably can, keeping a heart rate above 160 beats per minute, I can easily burn a thousand calories an hour. It's not that hard to burn off a thousand calories. I burn 50-70 calories per mile at 20+ mph.

I've done several 100+ mile bike rides and burned more 5,000 kcal for each one.

And yes, I'm using a heart rate monitor on the bike; I'm not just guessing.

- Warren
well keeping a pace where you burn 1000 kcal/hour for extended timeperiods is far out of reach for most. I could not do it and Im fit above avarage(strenght athlete though, not at all a endurance athlete) I assume you have alot of experience with endurance training?
When Im at it at the stairmaster I burn roughly 300kcal in 12 minutes. But I would be half dead doing that for a hour.

I was talking about avarage people, I should have specified that. I meant something a avarage person can do daily. I doubt most avarage people burn more than 700kcal tops when they train and very few have time or most importantly motivation to do that 7 times a week.

I would not even recomend anyone to try to burn more than at most 1000 kcal/day through endurance training since I personaly feel it is a much better way to cut down bodyfat by trying to improve muscle mass. To much cardio doesnt go hand in hand very well with increasing muscle mass. Slow twitch fibers doesnt have much growth potential.

I feel my point still stands firmly. Cardio can not balance out a poor diet. Unless we talk about extrem amounts and those that do those ammounts of cardio are usualy smart enough not to stuff themself with bigmac's everyday.
Everything revolves around what you put into your mouth.
 
  • #66
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
34
Azael,

I agree that you can't eat slop and then try to exercise yourself to death to counteract it. I agree that poor diets are hard on the liver, kidneys, and other organs.

I disagree that an average person can work their way up to 1000 kcal/hr exercise. From the time that I began biking, it probably took me about two months to get to the point where I can maintain 160+ bpm heart rate indefinitely, which burns about 1000 kcal/hr. I'm no elite cyclist by any means. I'm probably in the 60th-70th percentile among (recreational) competitive cyclists.

It sounds to me like you're hitting the stair master a bit too hard. The highest heart-rate that I can maintain indefinitely is about 175 bpm. Anything over 185 bpm (which would correspond to about 1400 kcal/hr) is not sustainable for me. That's above my lactate threshold, and I end up taking about five minutes to recover from even a brief sprint above 190 bpm. I strongly suggest that people use a heart rate monitor for any kind of cardiovascular exercise -- they make a remarkable difference. And, you're right, the vast majority of people are not physically capable of sustaining more than 1000 kcal/hr without enormous amounts of lactate-threshold training, which is pretty much hell on earth.

- Warren
 
  • #67
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,490
52
Of course, the people who are exercising enough to burn 1000 kcal/hr are generally not the ones engorging themselves on fat-laden, oversized portions in restaurants. :biggrin:
 
  • #68
chroot
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
10,226
34
Moonbear said:
Of course, the people who are exercising enough to burn 1000 kcal/hr are generally not the ones engorging themselves on fat-laden, oversized portions in restaurants. :biggrin:
You'd be surprised how much I can eat after two hours on the bike. :redface: :bugeye:

- Warren
 
  • #69
Mk
1,984
3
I can easily burn a thousand calories an hour. It's not that hard to burn off a thousand calories.
Wow. That sounds unhealthy. To me, that sounds just as a bad as eating several big macs. If you are on a standard 2,000 kcal diet, and bike like that for two hours... how much energy do you have left? A few days with only one hour of biking and 2,000 kcal/day, you're a dead man.

I know you don't eat that little during biking like that, but that seems too close to death to me.
 
  • #70
Moonbear
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
11,490
52
Mk said:
Wow. That sounds unhealthy. To me, that sounds just as a bad as eating several big macs. If you are on a standard 2,000 kcal diet, and bike like that for two hours... how much energy do you have left? A few days with only one hour of biking and 2,000 kcal/day, you're a dead man.

I know you don't eat that little during biking like that, but that seems too close to death to me.
Why do you assume he isn't increasing his caloric intake sufficiently to make up for the energy burned with biking, especially given the post directly above yours where he references the amount of food he eats after biking?
 
  • #71
253
0
chroot said:
Azael,

I agree that you can't eat slop and then try to exercise yourself to death to counteract it. I agree that poor diets are hard on the liver, kidneys, and other organs.

I disagree that an average person can work their way up to 1000 kcal/hr exercise. From the time that I began biking, it probably took me about two months to get to the point where I can maintain 160+ bpm heart rate indefinitely, which burns about 1000 kcal/hr. I'm no elite cyclist by any means. I'm probably in the 60th-70th percentile among (recreational) competitive cyclists.

It sounds to me like you're hitting the stair master a bit too hard. The highest heart-rate that I can maintain indefinitely is about 175 bpm. Anything over 185 bpm (which would correspond to about 1400 kcal/hr) is not sustainable for me. That's above my lactate threshold, and I end up taking about five minutes to recover from even a brief sprint above 190 bpm. I strongly suggest that people use a heart rate monitor for any kind of cardiovascular exercise -- they make a remarkable difference. And, you're right, the vast majority of people are not physically capable of sustaining more than 1000 kcal/hr without enormous amounts of lactate-threshold training, which is pretty much hell on earth.

- Warren
Om doing a variation of HIIT(High intensity intervall training)on the stairmaster. What I have read about HIIT suggests that it is the most efficient way to increase endurance. Not sure if that is true but its fun and time efficient(I do it right after my weightlifting) :)

Most of my fatburning I do by regular walking. I walk 1,5 hours each day. Nothing like a long walk to calm the mind down:approve:

The rule of thumb in bodybuilding circles to burn fat is to stay betwen 75%-85% of max heart rate so that would be around 160 for me aswell. To bad that I have never dished out the cash for a heart rate monitor:grumpy:

If I sometime seem a bit defensive/offensive in my posts in this thread its just a bad habit, I am a moderator at a fitness forum so I have been discussing these things for years and years.
 
  • #72
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,924
2,235
chroot said:
Each day that I ride my bike to work (around a 32 mile round trip), I burn approximately 1400 kcal. When I'm pedaling as hard as I reasonably can, keeping a heart rate above 160 beats per minute, I can easily burn a thousand calories an hour. It's not that hard to burn off a thousand calories. I burn 50-70 calories per mile at 20+ mph.

I've done several 100+ mile bike rides and burned more 5,000 kcal for each one.
When I was in university - I'd run about 3 miles a day, play soccer, ride my bike just about everywhere. During summers and holidays, I'd work construction (structural steel). I could easily burn 4000-5000 cal. I would have to eat about 1 kg of food a day to maintain weight.

Since I am older, and somewhat less active, I don't need to eat as much, but when I do gardening or start playing sports, I have to increase my food intake.

One has to be conditioned to be able to sustain a pace in which one would burn 1000 cal/hr.

I stay with a friend when I visit San Diego. We used to go to a gym for weightlifting and running on treadmill or stationary cycle. I used to max out the treadmill at 10 mph for several minutes, and my pulse rate would max out at 130 bpm.

Azael said:
I would not even recomend anyone to try to burn more than at most 1000 kcal/day through endurance training since I personaly feel it is a much better way to cut down bodyfat by trying to improve muscle mass. To much cardio doesnt go hand in hand very well with increasing muscle mass. Slow twitch fibers doesnt have much growth potential.
I don't necessarily agree with this assertion. With a proper combination of weight training, stretching and cardio one can add muscle mass and endurance (improve cardio efficiency). This is the approach I used 30 years ago, when I did weight training and construction (mentioned above).

I increased my body weight by about 10 kgs to 80 kgs, and I was lifting (military) more than 110 kgs with reps of 100 kgs, and on bench press I was doing about 140-150 kgs). At the same time, I was running long distance 3-5 miles daily, with the last quarter mile at full sprint, and riding a bicycle.

Stretching is really important!
 
  • #73
253
0
Astronuc said:
I don't necessarily agree with this assertion. With a proper combination of weight training, stretching and cardio one can add muscle mass and endurance (improve cardio efficiency). This is the approach I used 30 years ago, when I did weight training and construction (mentioned above).

I increased my body weight by about 10 kgs to 80 kgs, and I was lifting (military) more than 110 kgs with reps of 100 kgs, and on bench press I was doing about 140-150 kgs). At the same time, I was running long distance 3-5 miles daily, with the last quarter mile at full sprint, and riding a bicycle.

Stretching is really important!
Again I was to unspecific :blushing: :frown:
I should have mentioned not burning over 1000kcal/day through cardio while on a fat loss diet. I am so used to talking about conditions during a kcal restricted diet that I by habit leave it as unsaid but understood on the board I browse. If you gained 10kg I assume you where eating atleast 500kcal above maintanance(including the kcal burned during cardio into the maintanance).
Offcourse the kcal and macronutrient ammounts can be tweaked to allow it. That I agree with 100%.:tongue2:

Doing a excess of cardio and alot of weightlifting during kcal restricted diet can screw up the body royaly. I did the misstake once myself and it took me 5 months to get back on track again.

Imo its better and easier to maintain strenght and muscle on a restricted kcal diet if using the absolut minimum of cardio nessecary to boost fatloss.
Using some high intensity cardio aids alot in explosive strenght gains. But to much long distance cardio will hinder strenght gain.
Especialy since the body want to convert muscle fibers into slow twich fibers because of endurance training and into fast twitch fibers from strenght training. Fast twitch fibers are what is used in explosive/strenght movements. If someone wants to maximise strenght and muscle tissue gains long distance endurance training should be avoided.

That is a very respectable benchpress for that bodyweight :) and the militarypress is awsome.
What kind of style of training did you use? Was it a more bodybuilding style routine or was it more of a powerlifting routine?? I would love to know your entire layout both cardio and weightlifting if you remember it and have patience to write it up:cool:

Best I have done is 140kg in the bench at 84kg bodyweight. I am more of a deadlifter/puller though. I am a very poor in all pressing exercises mostly because of my very poor shoulder strenght(triceps are by far my dominant pressing muscle).

How many kilometers is 3-5 miles? Around 4-7 kilometers right?? When I speak of long distance I usualy mean running more than 8-10 kilometers.
Doing 3-4 kilometer runs and periodicaly switching pace from slow pace run to sprints would be a very good way of doing a HIIT sessions. I would do it myself if my knees would allow it:grumpy:

I have split feelings about stretching. I stretch some for safety reasons but not to much. Many powerlifters avoid stretching(atleast as a wamup) because(they claim) a stretched muscle is not as strong as a unstretched(but warm offcourse) muscle. I have noticed that myself but might be just mental.
 
  • #74
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
18,924
2,235
Azael said:
How many kilometers is 3-5 miles? Around 4-7 kilometers right?? When I speak of long distance I usualy mean running more than 8-10 kilometers.
3 - 5 miles is ~5-9 km. I also did sprints on a bicycle, which in combination with squats can build very strong leg muscles (thigh and quadraceps).

Azael said:
Doing 3-4 kilometer runs and periodicaly switching pace from slow pace run to sprints would be a very good way of doing a HIIT sessions. I would do it myself if my knees would allow it:grumpy:
Consider wearing knee braces for those times when the knees are stressed.

Azael said:
I have split feelings about stretching. I stretch some for safety reasons but not to much. Many powerlifters avoid stretching(atleast as a wamup) because(they claim) a stretched muscle is not as strong as a unstretched(but warm offcourse) muscle. I have noticed that myself but might be just mental.
In my experience, stetching alone tends to increase muscle strength (by 10-20%). I never had bulging muscles. I prefer to retain full and maximum range for arms and legs. I also did Tae Kwon Do, briefly Karate, and recently some Kung Fu/ Kempo which are also good exercises for strength and cardio fitness, as well as relaxing.

I prefer strength to size, so I trained for maximum strength-to-mass ratio.
 

Related Threads on Restaurant food: Healthier vs?

  • Last Post
3
Replies
74
Views
7K
  • Last Post
Replies
9
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
23
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
4K
Replies
25
Views
4K
  • Last Post
2
Replies
29
Views
4K
Replies
42
Views
4K
Replies
16
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
3K
Replies
27
Views
3K
Top