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Review my Forces

  1. Feb 15, 2015 #1

    RJLiberator

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    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Three Boxes, A, B, and C, are connected to each other using light vertical ropes, with box B hanging below box A, and C hanging below B. Call the tension in the rope connecting A and B "T_1" and that between B and C "T_2". A constant upward force F is applied to box A. Together, the boxes have a downward acceleration a. Gravity, as usual, pulls downwards, and take the positive direction as upwards. a) Make a labeled drawing. B) draw correct and complete free-body diagrams. c) give the equation(s) that come from the free body diagrams. You do not need to solve for anything.

    2. Relevant equations

    F=ma

    3. The attempt at a solution

    I am most concerned with C.

    For box a: F-Ft_1-F_g=m_a*a
    For box b: Ft_1-Ft_2-F_g=m_b*a
    For box c: Ft_2-F_g=m_c*a

    1) my acceleration, a, is the same for all boxes
    2) There is no normal force as the problem does not state that the boxes are on the ground or anything(?)
    3) Should the mass for box c include the mass's of A+B???

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 15, 2015 #2

    Nathanael

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    Right

    Right

    Why?
     
  4. Feb 15, 2015 #3

    RJLiberator

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    Hm. Since there is no normal force, and these boxes are accelerating upwards, it does not make sense to include all mass's for box c.
     
  5. Feb 15, 2015 #4

    Nathanael

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    When it says something like "make a free body diagram for box C" or "evaluate all the forces on box C" then you are taking box C as it's own system. That means the mass of the system is the mass of box C, regardless of any normal forces.
    Normal forces would just mean that different forces are acting on box C, but it wouldn't change the mass of box C.
     
  6. Feb 15, 2015 #5

    RJLiberator

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    I see.

    Thank you for the clarification. That makes sense.
     
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