Revolving door of Iraq war reasoning-This time it's OIL

  • News
  • Thread starter faust9
  • Start date
Hurkyl
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
14,843
17
P.S. quite frankly, I would support the formation of a religious theocracy if that's what the Iraqi people want to have. (Since, of course, that's more important than what I might want the Iraqi people to have)
 
Skyhunter
Hurkyl said:
(Yes, the civilian population was not terrorized by "Shock and Awe" -- afterwards, they were out in the streets rejoicing and praising the coalition, not cowering in their homes in fear of the coalition)
So what would you call this?

A fraternity hazing?

LONDON, England -- Public health experts have estimated that around 100,000 Iraqi civilians have died since the United States invaded Iraq in March last year.

In a survey published on the Web site of the Lancet medical journal on Friday, experts from the United States and Iraq also said the risk of death for Iraqi civilians was 2.5 times greater after the invasion.

There has been no official figure for the number of Iraqis killed since the conflict began 18 months ago, but some non-government estimates have ranged from 10,000 to 30,000.

The researchers surveyed nearly 1000 Iraqi households in September, asking how many people lived in the home and how many births and deaths there had been since January 2002.

They then compared the death rate among those households during the 15 months before the invasion with the 18 months after it, getting death certificates where they could.

The experts from the United States and Iraq said most of those who died were women and children and air strikes from coalition forces accounted for most of the violent deaths.
http://www.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/meast/10/29/iraq.deaths/ [Broken]

Hurkyl said:
Let's try this again: some don't want is there. You don't have nearly enough information to claim they don't want us there. (Well, I suppose that you could have that information, and just refraining from presenting it... but I don't have nearly enough information to make that a reasonable assumption. :biggrin:)
There is a huge insurgency and it is growing. I am fairly certain that the insurgents don't want us there. And it would be reasonable to assume, that not all of the non-insurgents are particularly thrilled with having their country occupied by a foreign power.

Hurkyl said:
Is it really so inconceivable to you that some of us simply don't want to abandon the Iraqi people, and wish to continue with a course of action with the potential of stabilizing the country?
If I believed that was our motive I would support it but in the words of king George "fool me twice... well you can't get fooled again."

Hurkyl said:
If you were really so sure that there is no hope, then it is more likely you'll persuade us to your point of view by presenting a convincing argument that there is no hope than your current course of action of asserting that we're too arrogant, or whatever, to be convinced.

(Besides, isn't that approach entirely futile? If you were actually right that we're too arrogant, or whatever, to be convinced, then what is the point of trying to convince us?)
I don't think you are to arrogant to be convinced. I think you want to believe this administration because you are an American. You want to believe the best about America. That is why you are willing to disregard all the inconsistencies and ignore the blatant lies from the mouth of your president. If the Downing street memo does not convince you that they lied and led us to war under false pretenses there is nothing I can say to convince you. I argue for the sake of others who may view this thread.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
vanesch
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
5,007
16
Hurkyl said:
P.S. quite frankly, I would support the formation of a religious theocracy if that's what the Iraqi people want to have. (Since, of course, that's more important than what I might want the Iraqi people to have)
I think this is very sad. If all Iraqis wanted that, I'd say they're silly but let them have it. But we now have an ethnic group imposing this upon another one. Imagine that tomorrow, because they are in a majority, people decide to change the US into a Christian theocracy...
I think they were better off with Saddam than with a theocracy, honestly.
 
Skyhunter
Hurkyl said:
P.S. quite frankly, I would support the formation of a religious theocracy if that's what the Iraqi people want to have. (Since, of course, that's more important than what I might want the Iraqi people to have)
I would support this as well. But not with the lives of American soldiers.

btw-I do not support the idea of abandoning Iraq and just cutting and running. I agree with Colin Powell, we broke it, we own it. My argument is that this administration has lost all credibility. We need a regime change here in America before we can solve the problems in Iraq!
 
Skyhunter
vanesch said:
I think this is very sad. If all Iraqis wanted that, I'd say they're silly but let them have it. But we now have an ethnic group imposing this upon another one. Imagine that tomorrow, because they are in a majority, people decide to change the US into a Christian theocracy...
I think they were better off with Saddam than with a theocracy, honestly.
Not necessarily, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
 
24
0
it is suggested that iraq is a country that was metaphorically sick...

America is the doctor who diagnosed it, and is force feeding the medication... (we don't want their illness to spread)... after some regular treatments and a burning of cancerous cells, iraq will get a lobotomy and learn to adapt to an American friendly system..... thereafter a regular colonic is all that will be required to keep their people happy.

Drug companies make people believe they are sick... propoganda is powerful, and people will do anything to get better.

lame post... i know... the justifications from the bush admin are just are equally lame...
 
vanesch
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
5,007
16
Skyhunter said:
Not necessarily, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
I think that a dictator is better than a theocracy (hell, almost ANYTHING is better than a theocracy), because sooner or later, the dictator will be gone (when he dies of old age, for instance). Against theocracy, there's not much that you can do except a religious war. Europe has had a theocratic reign for more than 1000 years ! It's not the brightest period in its history.
 
Skyhunter
vanesch said:
I think that a dictator is better than a theocracy (hell, almost ANYTHING is better than a theocracy), because sooner or later, the dictator will be gone (when he dies of old age, for instance). Against theocracy, there's not much that you can do except a religious war. Europe has had a theocratic reign for more than 1000 years ! It's not the brightest period in its history.
Good point. I wasn't looking at the larger scope. Damn trees got in the way and I couldn't see the forest.
 
BobG
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
110
80
vanesch said:
Hurkyl said:
P.S. quite frankly, I would support the formation of a religious theocracy if that's what the Iraqi people want to have. (Since, of course, that's more important than what I might want the Iraqi people to have)
I think this is very sad. If all Iraqis wanted that, I'd say they're silly but let them have it. But we now have an ethnic group imposing this upon another one. Imagine that tomorrow, because they are in a majority, people decide to change the US into a Christian theocracy...
I think they were better off with Saddam than with a theocracy, honestly.
I think this is a key point. Under Saddam, you had a dictator popular with Sunnis who repressed and killed Kurds and Shiites. Right now, the Iraqi constitution is looking as if it might just turn into Shiites imposing their will on Sunnis and Kurds and eliminating womens' rights, to boot. Not much of an improvement, even if it didn't virtually guarantee more problems with insurgents in the Sunni region.

Even if all of Iraq wanted a Shiite theocracy, I wouldn't consider a Shiite theocracy in Iraq something worth Americans fighting for.
 
alexandra
Hurkyl said:
(Yes, the civilian population was not terrorized by "Shock and Awe" -- afterwards, they were out in the streets rejoicing and praising the coalition, not cowering in their homes in fear of the coalition)
Did you mean this, Hurkyl?

Reference: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article2838.htm

A Tale of Two Photos

You have probably seen the photos of the statue of Saddam Hussein being toppled, and TV footage of jubilant Iraqis rolling the bronze head around, bringing back memories of so many previous popular uprisings – 1989, 1956, 1953...

If there is one thing this war has taught us all, it's that we can't believe what we're told. For Donald Rumsfeld these were "breathtaking". For the British Army they were "historic". For BBC Radio they were "amazing".


A wide angle shot in which you can see the whole of Fardus Square (conveniently located just opposite the Palestine Hotel where the international media are based), and the presence of at most around 200 people – most of them US troops (note the tanks and armored vehicles) and assembled journalists.

The BBC website had the honesty to say that "dozens" of Iraqis were involved, but this grain of truth was swamped by the overwhelming impression of mass joy. The radio and TV were even worse.
Photographs can be viewed here: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article2838.htm

Check the other page as well:
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article2842.htm
alex
 
Last edited by a moderator:
61
0
alexandra said:
Did you mean this, Hurkyl?



Photographs can be viewed here: http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article2838.htm

Check the other page as well:
http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article2842.htm
alex
Trust me, if there wasn't as much celebrating as claimed, cnn would have shown it. Anything good happening in Iraq won't be reported by CNN unless they have to, but they'll still try to spin it.

you can't trust everything you see on the internet. let's see that same story from some other sources.
 
alexandra
1 said:
Trust me, if there wasn't as much celebrating as claimed, cnn would have shown it. Anything good happening in Iraq won't be reported by CNN unless they have to, but they'll still try to spin it.

you can't trust everything you see on the internet. let's see that same story from some other sources.
What can I say, fibonacci? You say the photographs are not real, somehow? Perception theory tells us that we will create a reality we want to believe. CNN is not quite as anti-government or 'left' as you think it is. CNN is just as right-wing as the rest of the official media channels.

(Ok, I'm ducking for cover...)

alex
 
57
0
1 said:
Trust me, if there wasn't as much celebrating as claimed, cnn would have shown it. Anything good happening in Iraq won't be reported by CNN unless they have to, but they'll still try to spin it.

you can't trust everything you see on the internet. let's see that same story from some other sources.
http://www.cnn.com/2003/WORLD/meast/04/09/sprj.irq.statue/

Yeah Rigth!
 
alexandra
SOS2008
Gold Member
18
0
Hurkyl said:
Is it really so inconceivable to you that some of us simply don't want to abandon the Iraqi people, and wish to continue with a course of action with the potential of stabilizing the country?

If you were really so sure that there is no hope, then it is more likely you'll persuade us to your point of view by presenting a convincing argument that there is no hope than your current course of action of asserting that we're too arrogant, or whatever, to be convinced.

(Besides, isn't that approach entirely futile? If you were actually right that we're too arrogant, or whatever, to be convinced, then what is the point of trying to convince us?)
Progress in discussion would be much better if you would please include member names when you quote them in your posts.

What I realize is that neocons want a permanent presence in Iraq, and want to likewise expand into other areas of the Middle East (e.g., Iran, maybe Syria, etc.), so excuse me if I'm skeptical about altruistic motives of really giving a #$%&! about the Iraqi people -- Not to mention this administration and its supporters lack any understanding of the Middle East, and why people like me were against the invasion from day one. And to that point, I agree with earlier posts regarding Iran and also having Persian friends (clear back to the hostage crisis) and hearing their views--At least read publications by Middle East experts, for example, like Robin Wright http://www.mtholyoke.edu/acad/intrel/rwright.htm [Broken] -- people who actually know what they're talking about. I hope Bush is contained until 2008, and hopefully the new administration will be able to mend fences and create a better foreign policy.

To answer your question, the U.S., particularly under our very unpopular president Bush is not likely to ever achieve stability in Iraq. The only chance in hell is if people like Clark, Kerry, even Clinton or Carter could become involved to gain international support so as to allow the U.S. troops to draw down. I don't see Bush accepting what he would view as humiliating admittance of incompetency. So we're screwed until we get a new president (i.e., 2008).

And I don't agree that an open time table will be detrimental, because I believe the resistance to U.S. presence will continue regardless of what we do. Who cares if terrorists claim victory against Bush, since most of the world already knows victory against an idiot doesn't mean much. Also, if Iraq collapses, let's weigh the damage of this happening versus the U.S. staying. Think about these things, and tell us how it would make a difference, not just that you fear it would happen.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
310
2
1 said:
Trust me, if there wasn't as much celebrating as claimed, cnn would have shown it. Anything good happening in Iraq won't be reported by CNN unless they have to, but they'll still try to spin it.
alexandra said:
See, fibonacci? Did CNN support or not support the lies about the 'crowds'! It amazes me what some people think are 'liberal' sources of information!

alex
for sure alex, there is not a single 'liberal' news organization in america (well at least not on TV). How often has CNN reported on labour strikes, on the use of sweat shops by corporations (and their tax cuts), when has CNN ever aired any coverage at of any of the massive anti-bush rallies? Or any rally at all, any of the demonstations outside the white house, any of the squattings in government buildings? When did CNN report on the recent events of the zapatista movement? When has CNN covered no borders encuentro? When did CNN cover the shutting down of indymedia in Paris? When did CNN say anything about the enviromental protest in iceland that the police attacked, completely unprovoked?

I wonder, how many of these events you've even heard of before now 112?

They couldn't. They wouldn't be allowed to. If they aired anything that harmfull to the corporations they would be sued out of business, just like the eXile branch that had to shut down after only a single publication. It wouldn't happen, it wouldn't be allowed.

Everything's just Radical right and not-quite radical right. There is no liberal mass media in the USA today, it's not allowed. America isn't free anymore.
 
Last edited:
Skyhunter
Smurf said:
Everything's just Radical right and not-quite radical right. There is no liberal mass media in the USA today, it's not allowed. America isn't free anymore.
There is Air America Radio if you can call that liberal mass media.

We still have NPR and PBS for objective news.

Oops maybe I spoke to soon.

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines05/0502-01.htm [Broken]

Oh well there is still the internet.

(not even going to look I don't want to know)
 
Last edited by a moderator:
279
0
A BBC ed. report today, indicated that Katrina is lighting a fire under journalistic butts:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4214516.stm

Otherwise, I saw a report a month or two ago, that in the 70's the democrats took their money from media and put it into grass roots organisations.

If this is true, and if there has been a switch towards GOP friendly reporting, then perhaps it is because democrats haven't been donating as much to the media.

Over thrity years, that could make a slow but steady difference.
 
310
2
Skyhunter said:
There is Air America Radio if you can call that liberal mass media.

We still have NPR and PBS for objective news.

Oops maybe I spoke to soon.

http://www.commondreams.org/headlines05/0502-01.htm [Broken]

Oh well there is still the internet.

(not even going to look I don't want to know)
Never heard air america, hope it's good. PBS I like, some of the best documentaries I've seen on PBS. And yes, the internet is the last bastion for non-conformist news networks. Thank god for the net.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Skyhunter
Smurf said:
Never heard air america, hope it's good. PBS I like, some of the best documentaries I've seen on PBS. And yes, the internet is the last bastion for non-conformist news networks. Thank god for the net.
Air America is a liberal radio network formed as a counter to the right wing talk shows that domninate AM radio.

http://www.airamericaradio.com/listen
 
310
2
Hey, at least we can claim much better music bands!
 
Skyhunter
pattylou said:
A BBC ed. report today, indicated that Katrina is lighting a fire under journalistic butts:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/4214516.stm

Otherwise, I saw a report a month or two ago, that in the 70's the democrats took their money from media and put it into grass roots organisations.

If this is true, and if there has been a switch towards GOP friendly reporting, then perhaps it is because democrats haven't been donating as much to the media.

Over thirty years, that could make a slow but steady difference.
The biggest change was when Reagan repealed the fairness doctrine that required anyone using the public airwaves to present all sides of a political issue. This allowed wealthy ideologues to bankroll people like Rush Limbaugh. They only present one side and that is usually so distorted that it isn't even remotely related to the truth. They screen their calls so the listeners get the impression that everyone agrees with them except for a "few wacko vegetarian eco-terrorists. After 20 years they now have a following of about 20 million brain-washed followers that believe their is a liberal conspiracy against America.

just watch and see how many respond to this post
 

Related Threads for: Revolving door of Iraq war reasoning-This time it's OIL

Replies
24
Views
4K
  • Poll
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Last Post
7
Replies
158
Views
10K
  • Last Post
4
Replies
98
Views
11K
  • Last Post
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Poll
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
17
Views
3K
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
1K
Top