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RF engineering

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  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

Hi, I'm interested about situation in radio frequency engineering. Is there difficult to find a job in this profssion and what jobs exactly RF engineers do?

Thanks.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
fss
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It is not easy to find a job in any profession, in general.

RF engineers work with RF electronics. Cell phones, receivers, radios, pretty much anything that transmits or receives a signal.
 
  • #3
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Ok then, what is most important to study in RF engineering? Or any advice about extra literature or any projects and interests that will help me to "get into" that job (like beginners career path)?
One more thing that cofusing me all the time: Is RF engineering counting under electrical engineering, IT, or electronical sub? A lot of different categories on web is placed. It's on some colleges named like "wireless engineering"?

p.s. I'm still on college.

Thanks.
 
Last edited:
  • #4
fss
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Ok then, what is most important to study in RF engineering?
Whatever the curriculum says you have to study. Generally RF engineers are strong in math and, if you want to get into the circuit design arena, you have to really be on your game in terms of knowing the realistic capabilities of various components and board layout.


Or any advice about extra literature or any projects and interests that will help me to "get into" that job (like beginners career path)?
Buy one of those "build a radio" starter kits, or look into HAMming if it's allowed in your country.

One more thing that cofusing me all the time: Is RF engineering counting under electrical engineering, IT, or electronical sub? A lot of different categories on web is placed.
Depending on where you work and what context you're in it can be considered any of the above.
 
  • #5
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What most interests you about RF engineering? If it's component level design you should learn about microstrip, noise figure, S parameters, Smith Charts, transmission lines and how components' characteristics change at high frequencies. (Inductors can become capacitors and capacitors, inductors)

If you're more interested in system engineering, you should study path loss, link budgets and propagation modeling. Systems engineering is determining where to put base stations, how much power they need, avoiding interference to other base stations, etc.

Unfortunately, much of component and board level design has been moved overseas but system engineering is very active right now.

One industry with which I am familiar, the railroads, are undergoing a nationwide overhaul of their radio systems just as a large percentage of their communications engineers are retiring and they are in desperate need of replacements.
 
  • #6
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I'm most interested in antenas, physical radio comunicatin (any), would like to work on maintance (or design) for huge systems (or any comunication system). Less interested in programg.

edit: HAM is alowed but extremly expensive in my country
 
  • #7
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What country are you in?
 
  • #8
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East Europe, Balkan. Why?
 
  • #9
RF engineers are one of those fields that looks like it's going to blow up in next 2 years. Very good field to be in. Make sure you get full cycle experience and you'll be set. Seriously, it's a very good career.
 
  • #10
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OK. Thanks.
 

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