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RF frequency testing

  1. Apr 11, 2013 #1

    fsx

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    Hi, i have been doing a science project about radiation of smartphone functions. I have tried to use a EM wave receiver to measure the frequency of RF but it didn't work.How can i measure it (in hertz)?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 11, 2013 #2
    The needed equipment is a radio spectrum analyzer. Cell phones use frequencies of 900 mhz to 1.5 ghz. Due to that the equipment to measure in hertz is not cheap.

    The other problem is cellphones have low radiated power of less than 1 watt. Even RF spectrum analyzers have diffiulty measuring cell phone radiation.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  4. Apr 11, 2013 #3

    fsx

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    can i measure the wavelength at first and then calculate the frequency?
     
  5. Apr 11, 2013 #4
    The frequency changes depending on availability. Your best bet is try www.radiogeeks.com its a radio forum but they also deal with cell phones.

    You might be able to use a sensitive oscilloscope with the probes coming off the internal antenna but I can't quarantee that. The radiogeeks forum may have affordable solutions
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2013
  6. Apr 11, 2013 #5
    Here is the link to the Forum

    http://radiogeeks.us/index.php?forums/general-discussion-forum.109/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 6, 2017
  7. Apr 13, 2013 #6

    fsx

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    Thanks
     
  8. Apr 13, 2013 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    That would be just as much of a problem. You will need some sort of receiver because you are unlikely to get enough power to operate a wavemeter (which really needs a source of CW to work and cell phone signals are not like that).
    Cheaper than a severalGHz oscilloscope or spectrum analyser, a 'scanner' can be bought for around £100 and that can be used to find and detect all sorts of signals. It can be used over the whole of the radio spectrum for general interest - Air Band, Marine Band, Broadcasts etc..
     
  9. Apr 13, 2013 #8

    davenn

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    A decent frequency counter that goes up to 2.7GHz is also available for under US$250. Readily available on eBay. Etc
     
  10. Apr 13, 2013 #9

    sophiecentaur

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    Problem with a frequency counter is that it is not frequency 'selective' (no filter) and it needs a hefty signal to make it work.
     
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