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Rhodium Catalyst

  • Thread starter Physics345
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement


I was reviewing chem the other day, and noticed this question can anyone clarify my answer for me and let me know if I'm correct.

The question states:

Describe three uses of rhodium as a catalyst. ( include both a written description and the balancecd equation).

Homework Equations




The Attempt at a Solution


[/B]
The rhodium in this case will help catalyze the reduction of nitrogen oxides [2NO_x → xO_2+N_2]. Secondly another use would be of the carbonylation reaction by adding a carbon dioxide molecule into methanol. H_3 COH+CO→H_3 CCOOH. Thirdly and finally, it can be used as vapour conversion of carbon oxide to carbon dioxide, which reduces water by adding a carbon dioxide molecule which looks like this: CO+H_2 O→CO_2+H^+
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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The last reaction - as written - is technically impossible (can't be balanced).
 
  • #3
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The last reaction - as written - is technically impossible (can't be balanced).
Hi Borek, it's been a while! First off thanks for the reply it is very much appreciated.
But there is vapour conversion of carbon oxide to carbon dioxide right?
Also why exactly is it impossible?
 
Last edited:
  • #4
Borek
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You can't balance the equation, so the process can't follow it.

Doesn't mean there is no vapor conversion of oxides, just the reaction equation must be different.
 
  • #5
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You can't balance the equation, so the process can't follow it.

Doesn't mean there is no vapor conversion of oxides, just the reaction equation must be different.
CO2 + OH ---> CO + H2O
Would it look more like this then?
 
  • #6
Borek
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No such thing as OH (unless you mean a hydroxyl radical, but radicals are so reactive they don't need a catalyst).

Plus, it still can't be balanced.
 
  • #7
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No such thing as OH (unless you mean a hydroxyl radical, but radicals are so reactive they don't need a catalyst).

Plus, it still can't be balanced.
What exactly am I not understanding here?
Also is there any thing I should relearn to understand this better?
 
  • #8
Borek
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Catalyst can work only on real reactions - that means a balanced equation. Try to balance the two equations you posted.
 

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