Riding a bike to class?

  • #51
253
1
I was going to assemble it fully today and try it out but you know what? There is a fancy new bicycle valve stem that my compressor wont fit! Autoparts stores don't have a presta adapter and I don't live near a bike shop lol.
Yea, presta valves can be a pain in the a**.
 
  • #52
1,039
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I just found out there's a shower in our building too... but it's apparently in one of the men's bathrooms AND doesn't have a door or curtain to the stall.

This came up because there is bathroom renovation going on on my floor... that finally added functional toilets but still no stalls or main door... and not sure as to the "gender." Only for the adventurous/exhibitionist grad students now...
:rofl:

Yeah I heard they started offering grad programs in gender studies.
 
  • #53
67
0
Got a new bike yesterday. Although it seems it was made for 14 year-old, but it was all I could afford :(
 
  • #54
MarcoD
I have two bikes and no car. But that's normal in the Netherlands which is completely flat and has separate bike lanes everywhere. Everyone is bike crazy, this is a picture outside at the train station (one of the three bike parking places there):

bikes1.jpg


It's a way of living here.

(Anyway, as a Dutchman I would say it's hardly about the weather but about the road conditions and the amount of hill climbing.)
 
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  • #55
1,039
2
I have two bikes and no car. But that's normal in the Netherlands which is completely flat and has separate bike lanes everywhere. Everyone is bike crazy, this is a picture outside at the train station (one of the three bike parking places there):

bikes1.jpg


It's a way of living here.

(Anyway, as a Dutchman I would say it's hardly about the weather but about the road conditions and the amount of hill climbing.)
That looks a bit like our car parking lot lol.
 
  • #56
253
1
I have two bikes and no car. But that's normal in the Netherlands which is completely flat and has separate bike lanes everywhere. Everyone is bike crazy, this is a picture outside at the train station (one of the three bike parking places there):

bikes1.jpg


It's a way of living here.

(Anyway, as a Dutchman I would say it's hardly about the weather but about the road conditions and the amount of hill climbing.)
Oh man, time to move to the Netherlands I guess...
 
  • #57
26
0
Personally I skate (longboard) to class. It's easier to get off if i need to, it's really fun, and I can take it with me so no one will steal it or anything like that. I even made two of my own after building a wood press. plus it's funny to see people's reactions after talking to me since I'm not, uhh, a frat kid I guess.
 
  • #58
1,039
2
I went out for a ride today and learned how to use the gears but it wasn't working quite like I read. Looks like the rear ring does not shift all the way down to the smallest sprocket. I guess it's time to learn how to adjust the derailleur. If anyone knows a good resource for that..
 
  • #59
MATLABdude
Science Advisor
1,655
4
I went out for a ride today and learned how to use the gears but it wasn't working quite like I read. Looks like the rear ring does not shift all the way down to the smallest sprocket. I guess it's time to learn how to adjust the derailleur. If anyone knows a good resource for that..
Does the rear shifter indicate that it's gone to the highest gear (smallest sprocket), and indicates that you can only shift to the second-lowest? If so, your index is off by one and you need to manually (using a screwdriver or some such) shift the chain down (put it on the highest gear setting first and then just shift the chain to the bottom sprocket). If you hear rattling (like it's attempting to shift), you may need lubrication / derailleur cable trimming, but really, that shouldn't happen until after the break-in period (30-50 hours, or so I've been told by the LBS--note that there wasn't a profit motive involved, since the adjustment was provided free of charge!)

Sheldon Brown is a great quick resource. Zinn is probably more exhaustive. (Both mentioned and linked in previous posts in this thread by myself).
 
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  • #60
1,039
2
Does the rear shifter indicate that it's gone to the highest gear (smallest sprocket), and indicates that you can only shift to the second-lowest? If so, your index is off by one and you need to manually (using a screwdriver or some such) shift the chain down (put it on the highest gear setting first and then just shift the chain to the bottom sprocket). If you hear rattling (like it's attempting to shift), you may need lubrication / derailleur cable trimming, but really, that shouldn't happen until after the break-in period (30-50 hours, or so I've been told by the LBS--note that there wasn't a profit motive involved, since the adjustment was provided free of charge!)

Sheldon Brown is a great quick resource. Zinn is probably more exhaustive. (Both mentioned and linked in previous posts in this thread by myself).
I found a picture of the adjustment locations and gave it a shot last night until I got tired of trying to figure out which limit screw did what and took the whole thing apart to see how it works. Now it makes senses, works perfectly, rubs the front derailleur cage a little bit when the chain is on a low front and high rear gear(s). It was fun, and probably a useful skill to have. I did notice that the front derailleur's cable slips off the roller on it's back side. Looks like the lever for the thing is too far inward towards the seat tube. It only touches the roller in the lowest front gear but I think I'm going to call them about it. There is no way it was designed like this and I cannot see any alternative mounting method that would still shift gears.
 
  • #61
DoggerDan
I was going to assemble it fully today and try it out but you know what? There is a fancy new bicycle valve stem that my compressor wont fit! Autoparts stores don't have a presta adapter and I don't live near a bike shop lol.
Presta adapters cost a buck. http://www.google.com/products/cata...i=HV9-TqGMNIr_sQKezpAW&sqi=2&ved=0CDYQ8wIwAQ".

I carry one in my underseat bag, along with an alcohol wipe, a tube patch kit and two polymer "tire irons" used to get the tire bead over the rim. I also carry a portable bicycle pump, as walking home in cycling shoes because you have a flat really sucks!

It takes less than five minutes to fix a flat.

I'll hand pump it up enough to get to a gas station, then I'll use their air to fill it to spec, which for my tires is 8 bar (about 115 psi).
 
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  • #62
1,039
2
I purchased an adapter for a CO_{2} cylinder to presta valve and a pocket-knife like multi tool that has the little tire things in them. I finally took it out today and went about 20 miles. For some reason the shifting has me confused.

The rear shifting works fine, but the front shifter has 3 clicks but there are only 3 rings up front. I pull it once and it shifts up to the middle ring, then I pull it again and it doesn't quite make it to the largest ring. So to go from the middle to the large I have to pull the lever until it clicks twice? The derailleur is calibrated correctly I am positive now. It just barely misses the chain on the innermost ring and the outside of the cage barely misses the chain on the outer-most ring. Why is there an extra click in that shifter though?
 
  • #63
turbo
Gold Member
3,077
46
The rear shifting works fine, but the front shifter has 3 clicks but there are only 3 rings up front. I pull it once and it shifts up to the middle ring, then I pull it again and it doesn't quite make it to the largest ring. So to go from the middle to the large I have to pull the lever until it clicks twice? The derailleur is calibrated correctly I am positive now. It just barely misses the chain on the innermost ring and the outside of the cage barely misses the chain on the outer-most ring. Why is there an extra click in that shifter though?
If you are on a tour or race, and the cable actuating the derailleur stretches a bit, wouldn't it be nice to have a bit more movement available to switch the chain to the highest range? I'm not familiar with today's road-bikes, but I have tweaked my wife's bike and my own in the past with just such an attitude in mind. Try tuning them up so that they work perfectly, but there is just a little bit of actuating range available to compensate for temperature changes, stretching, etc.

You could dive the web-site of the derailleur manufacturer to see if this is indeed the case.
 
  • #64
DoggerDan
I ordered a little patch kit, replacement tubes, all that etc.

It arrived today.
Yeah!

I bolted it all together but have not tightened anything down yet (Yes I know the handlebars are upside-down). The size is correct which is great. I have no clue how to shift the thing, there are 4 levers for shifting... :confused:
Standard placement is "right rear," that is, the shift levers on the right control your rear derailler. On one side you have one lever to shift up the front derailer, the adjacent one shifts it down. On the other side you have the levers which control the rear.

Anyway, there were a few scrapes on the bike. The crankset has a pit on it's backside, there is a scuff under that thing that holds the handlebars and on the side of one of the braking mechanisms, as well as some scratches on the frame. It's nothing I can't live with, but it's a new bike. Do you think it's picky to send it back or request compensation? The UPS guy signed off that the box was damaged in shipping, and I took pictures as I examined every part while inspecting it and tossing on the wheels so I could set it up somewhere.

t0qjkg.jpg

Yeah that's a helmet, and yes I look silly in it. But at least it weighs practically nothing compared to the helmets I knew and never sported growing up.

I actually have a cycling backpack already that I can put any tools or whatever in. It's an osprey something or other that I use for hiking. I liked it because it's tiny, holds 3 liters of water, and still has plenty of storage.
Your bike has two mounting points for water bottle holders. I'd recommend you buy and mount two of them, as it'll save you from hauling around a backpack. Also, most underseat bags, also called wedge bags, are inexpensive, lightweight, and very functional. http://www.google.com/#q=under+seat...c.r_pw.&fp=ae20906f3b59ac0d&biw=858&bih=1036".

Even if you have to use a backpack to carry books, papers, and stuff, I'd still recommend the water bottles and wedge bag for those times when you go riding just for the fun of it. I know, it doesn't seem like you'd ever hop on it for a joy ride, but the more you ride it and the more fit you get, the more you will. I use mine for most close errands, but I'll use it for visiting downtown, too, about 8 miles away. What's a short 45-minute ride, anyway?

The other things I'd strongly recommend are below. Prices are guidelines, but if you're paying more, you're paying too much.

1. Flashing red rear http://www.google.com/#ds=pr&pq=hea...=&bav=on.2,or.r_gc.r_pw.&fp=ae20906f3b59ac0d"(LED) $10-20

2. Flashing/steady front http://www.google.com/#sclient=psy-...c.r_pw.&fp=ae20906f3b59ac0d&biw=858&bih=1036". $20-$50

or 1&2 http://www.google.com/products/cata...=S2R-TvfCL6ensALx0-0d&sqi=2&ved=0CKMBEPMCMAM": $50

3. Spoke reflectors - $5 to $15. I use these. They cost $16 but are really worth it as they're highly visible and cars know exactly what you are from a distance.

Items 1-3 are required by many state laws for riding at night. The following isn't, but I did a lot of night riding, so I did it at the recommendation of other night riders.

4. 3M Scotchlite reflective tape, 1/2". I used this on the sides of my frame simply to outline the fact that it's a bicycle frame. About $15 in a 50' roll.

5. Clip-in pedals and cycling shoes. About $100. Since I did a lot of riding in street clothes, I bought a pair of clip-in pedals that were clip-on on one side and standard pedal on the other.

6. http://www.google.com/search?q=bicycle+bibs&hl=en&tbm=shop&aq=1&oq=bicycle+bib". About $50. They may look funny to a novice, but there's a reason everyone wears them. In addition to the bib, I also have a pair of cycling long johns (about $70) and a cycling jacket (about $50) for winter.

Trust me, if you're going to be cycling when the temp is less than 50 deg, you'll come to love 'em. The outer layer is the same used with wetsuits, but without the neoprene. Instead, they're lined with a thin layer of microfleece. They breath well and shield much of the wind, but they're not waterproof.

7. Rainlegs. You can buy a full set of waterproof pants, but they get very hot. My rainlegs, on the other hand, cover only my knees, upper thighs, crotch, and lower abdomen. They weigh next to nothing but tremendously improve comfort while riding in the cold rain. About $30.

8. Booties. These neoprene boots zip on over your cycling shoes, waterproofing them and insulating them from the cold. About $20.

9. Rain shell. My winter cycling jacket isn't rain-proof (nor should it be), so I've a microlight rain shell I keep tied around my waist. The rain shell isn't waterproof, either, but it turns away about 90% of the rain. I have a waterproof rain shell, but even at 33 deg F, it gets too hot for comfort. About $15.

10. Bicycle gloves. These fingerless gloves REALLY improve comfort and will help protect your palms and knuckles in case of a fall. About $20

11. Sirius gloves - about $20. These wind/waterproof gloves are micro-light, very thin, and lined with a very fine layer of fleece. I use them beneath my cycling gloves on days when the temps are below 40.

12. Cycling balaclava. About $10. These aren't the thick warm ones. Rather, these are very thin, much like a heatgear shirt. You can easily breath through it, and your helmet will fit over it without a hitch. They protect your ears, lips, and nose from the cold, and will help hold heat in from your heat. A must for cycling during freezing temps.

13. Duofold thermal underwear tops and bottoms. About $40. I swear by these! Adds an extra layer of insulation that's definately worth it in colder temps.

All in all, I have about $600 invested in my cycling gear. Sounds like a lot, but if you're cycling in wet or cold weather, or at night, it's very well worth it.

The good news, QC, is if you're just going back and forth to school during the daytime in moderate temps and dry weather, however, you're already seat with the equipment you already have!
 
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  • #65
1,039
2
I won't be riding at night, and on the off chance that it rains, I'll just drive. It also never gets below 65 F here during the day in winter, and that's a really low estimate, it's usually pretty warm even then.

I did however purchase some pedals like these:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO/?tag=pfamazon01-20

I haven't got shoes yet though until I figure out what will fit and work with all the different bolt patterns and such. Light are state law at night here though.

As far as seat bags go, well I'm having trouble finding those too. Everything I see is huge and/or hangs off the seat funny. I really only need it to carry an inflation cylinder, little 1" by 2" tool (that has all the tools for my bike including tires and chain) a patch kit and my cellular phone.

I got a bottle holder today for 10 bucks though from a bike shop I paid a little more to true the wheels for me on the spot.

jhe9og.jpg


It's probably the highest quality thing on my bike lol.

I know the front derailleur having an extra click in the lever is on purpose, and the components are made for 3 cogs. There is some sort of trim feature, but I have yet to find any good explanation as to how to use it other than "It lets you adjust the derailleur cage when the chain rattles!". Yeah? Well that's great, how do I shift normally!?!?
 
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  • #67
DoggerDan
It also never gets below 65 F here during the day in winter, and that's a really low estimate, it's usually pretty warm even then.
Key West or Costa Rica? Lol..

I did however purchase some pedals like these:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001MZ2AGO/?tag=pfamazon01-20
Nice! And better than mine (green with envy over a simple pedal).

I haven't got shoes yet though until I figure out what will fit and work with all the different bolt patterns and such.
Smart. Since 100% of your motive power goes through them, it's best to make sure you get the most comfortable ones you can. I didn't have much of a selection, and have tried on better ones since. Can't wait until mine wear out!

As far as seat bags go, well I'm having trouble finding those too. Everything I see is huge and/or hangs off the seat funny. I really only need it to carry an inflation cylinder, little 1" by 2" tool (that has all the tools for my bike including tires and chain) a patch kit and my cellular phone.
Try http://www.google.com/products/cata...1538831&ei=VeqHTp_UEoa0MJ-NmIMB&ved=0CBAQrhI". It's cheap and will work until you find something more to your liking.

If you've a nice cell phone and live in rainy weather, try http://www.modernbike.com/itemgroup.asp?igpk=2126178782&TID=367&gclid=CNOiruiWyasCFW8EQAodLE8oNQ". Only $10 more but completely waterproof. I wrap my cell phone in a sock to keep it from getting scratched as it bounces around.

I got a bottle holder today for 10 bucks though from a bike shop I paid a little more to true the wheels for me on the spot.

It's probably the highest quality thing on my bike lol.
Cool! I am again envious. Mine's tubular, man. Old school, but functional.

I know the front derailleur having an extra click in the lever is on purpose, and the components are made for 3 cogs.
I thought you have three cogs? I call them sprockets.

There is some sort of trim feature, but I have yet to find any good explanation as to how to use it other than "It lets you adjust the derailleur cage when the chain rattles!". Yeah? Well that's great, how do I shift normally!?!?
You use the levers. The trim feature is used only when the shift levers are slightly off, which makes the chain rattle...

Fully of envy tonight, as I don't have a trim feature. I can, however, nudge the level which helps stop the rattling.

One thing I would definitely get is White Lightening's Clean Lube. SHAKE IT EXTREMELY WELL. It's wax-based, so no dirty grease. In fact, it doesn't attract dirt or dust, either, so it's outstanding for your chain. They have a number of similar products: http://www.whitelightningco.com/products/index.htm

You don't have to get all. I use Clean Lube for the chain, all cables, and the deraillers, Crystal Grease for all bearings.
 
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  • #68
1,039
2
I have been all over the place so far. I think I have around 150 mi on the odometer already, and I have only really been out 4 times. I tried on a bunch of shoes at a local store, and settled on a pair of Shimano TR-31 triathlon shoes. They were much more comfortable and practical for me. After some setup, and angling the little cleat things correctly, I can almost effortlessly get in and out of them. I have yet to encounter a situation where I need to rapidly escape though:eek:

I found a bag as well, a little Sci-con 230cc one. It locks on to the bars of the seat and doesn't flop around or anything. It is a bit too small though. It will fit everything except for my phone! I'll figure something else out for that as I don't really like the idea of my phone hanging out over the back tire waiting to fall off unnoticed.

Might grab some of that white lightening and clean my chain and use that instead. my right leg usually collects some chain printed grease marks. I have an idea how that third click thing works. I think it's supposed to go from the smallest front gear to a trimmed left middle gear for when the rear is in the larger gear. Then it clicks to a trim right mid gear in the front for a smaller rear gear, and finally it hops on over to the big gear. Still a bad idea to use dramatically crossing gears when not using the middle sprocket though.

One thing that I am not satisfied with is the brakes. The lever has to be pulled back until it almost meets the bars in order to make a hard brake. I read that it should stop about 1/2 way. If I add any more tension to the lines the pads drag the rim though. I wish I could somehow adjust the levers so that there is a different lever ratio.

I'm looking into getting some sort of otter-style case for my phone and mounting a generic bike frame clamp onto it so I can stick my phone somewhere in the frame such that it doesn't protrude.
 
  • #69
67
0
Sold my clown bike and purchased this one for exactly the same price (around $30):

cross-sprinter-se-hardtail-mountain-bike-2009-free-delivery--3296-p.jpg


I'm pretty happy, it at least fits me :)
 

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