Risk and Odds of daily production

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  • Thread starter throwawayo_k
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In summary: Best of luck! In summary, the risk and odds of having a bad day in terms of production are higher in the M-Thur shift, with a 1 in 5 chance for one bad day and 1 in 25 chance for two bad days per week. For the Fri-Sun shift, the odds are 1 in 6 for one bad day and 1 in 36 for two bad days per week. The impact of bad days on overall monthly production will vary depending on individual performance, but having more bad days will likely lead to lower production. The advantage of one shift over another depends on various factors such as hours worked and individual performance.
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throwawayo_k
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Risk and Odds of daily production
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Ok guys I'm no math expert but I'd like some help getting some statistics. I work for a company that tracks daily production for each associate. We have two shifts a (M-Thur) 10 hours shifts(40 hours a week) and a (Fri - Sun) 12 hour shifts (36 hours a week).
Now production is tracked by Tasks and Units. Now these tasks and units vary wildly day to day based on the orders coming in and their size. Sometimes its a task for 2 units, sometimes a task for 20.
I want to know what the risk and odds are for each shift if say 1 day out of their week is a bad day. And then what about two days. Assuming a 4 week work month. How impactful are those bad days to their overall monthly production. Is their and advantage working one shift over another, what is the advantage.

Thank you all for any help or pointers in the right direction!
 
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  • #2


Hello,

I can provide some insight into the risk and odds of daily production in this scenario.

Firstly, it is important to note that the risk and odds will vary depending on the specific tasks and units involved, as well as the individual performance of each associate. However, we can make some general assumptions and calculations to give an overall understanding.

For the M-Thur shift, which includes 40 hours of work per week, there are 4 potential bad days out of the 20 working days in a typical 4-week month (assuming no holidays). This means that the odds of having 1 bad day in a week is 4 out of 20, or 1 in 5. The odds of having 2 bad days in a week would be 4 out of 20 squared, or 1 in 25.

For the Fri-Sun shift, which includes 36 hours of work per week, there are 3 potential bad days out of the 18 working days in a typical 4-week month. This means that the odds of having 1 bad day in a week is 3 out of 18, or 1 in 6. The odds of having 2 bad days in a week would be 3 out of 18 squared, or 1 in 36.

In terms of impact on monthly production, it is difficult to give an exact answer without knowing the specific production targets and performance of each associate. However, we can assume that a bad day would result in lower production than a good day. Therefore, the more bad days a shift has, the greater the impact on their overall monthly production.

In terms of advantages of one shift over another, it is important to consider the hours worked. The M-Thur shift works 4 more hours per week, which could potentially lead to higher production if the associates are able to maintain the same level of productivity throughout the longer shift. However, this could also lead to fatigue and lower productivity towards the end of the shift. The Fri-Sun shift, on the other hand, has shorter shifts but also has fewer working days per week. This could potentially result in more rested and productive associates, but also means that each working day has a greater impact on their overall monthly production.

Ultimately, the advantage of one shift over another would depend on the specific tasks and units involved, as well as the individual performance and abilities of the associates.

I hope this helps provide some insight
 

Related to Risk and Odds of daily production

1. What is the definition of "risk" in terms of daily production?

Risk refers to the potential for negative outcomes or losses associated with daily production. It can include factors such as equipment failure, human error, or external events that may impact production levels.

2. How are the odds of daily production calculated?

The odds of daily production are typically calculated by dividing the number of successful production days by the total number of production days. This gives a ratio of successful to total production days, which can be used to determine the likelihood of a successful production day.

3. What factors can affect the risk and odds of daily production?

Several factors can impact the risk and odds of daily production, including the type of production process, the skill and experience of the production team, the reliability of equipment, and external factors such as weather or supply chain disruptions.

4. How can risk and odds of daily production be managed?

Risk and odds of daily production can be managed through various strategies, such as implementing quality control measures, regularly maintaining and monitoring equipment, providing training and support for production teams, and having contingency plans in place for potential disruptions.

5. Why is it important to consider risk and odds of daily production?

Considering risk and odds of daily production is crucial for businesses to ensure consistent and efficient production. By understanding and managing potential risks, companies can minimize losses and increase the likelihood of successful production days, leading to higher productivity and profitability.

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