Robotic Reproduction: Constructing Identical Robots from "Food

In summary, the conversation was about a Mechanical Engineering professor who has created robots that can assemble identical robots using "food" containing cubes with components, including microprocessors. The topic was compared to biological reproduction, with the suggestion that if the robots could eat plastic, silicon, and metals and create copies of themselves with working brains, it would be comparable. The link for more information was requested and provided, but the audio for the show was not yet archived. The caller also shared their previous attempts to call in to the show and their preference for a different show.
  • #1
rbj
2,227
10
just got off the phone.

the topic was about some Mechanical Engineering prof that has made some robots that can assemble identical robots from "food" that contains cubes with components some that contain microprocessors. i called in and told them that it wasn't comparable to biological reproduction (which was the plug at the beginning of the show) unless we eat human body parts and from that construct other human beings (or whatever biological beings). if these robots ate plastic and silicon and metals and from that created copies of themselves (with working brains, however they are constructed), then it *would* be comparable.

anyway, i thought this topic (of artificial reproduction of robotic "beings") could be of interest here.

r b-j
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Cool, I've seen several online articles on it, can you send us a link? Is it on npr.org or sciencefriday.com?
 
  • #3
Mk said:
Cool, I've seen several online articles on it, can you send us a link? Is it on npr.org or sciencefriday.com?

it's the latter. the page is at http://www.sciencefriday.com/pages/2005/May/hour1_051305.html but they do not yet have archived audio for that show.

ya know, it really wasn't that big of a deal, it's just that several times i have tried to call in that show, twice before i got through the busy signals only to be put on hold for the whole show. this was the first and only time i got to ask my question. (i've had much better luck with The Connection, but that is not as widely distributed as Talk of the Nation.)

r b-j
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related to Robotic Reproduction: Constructing Identical Robots from "Food

1. How is it possible to construct identical robots from "food"?

Robotic reproduction involves using advanced technology to synthesize and assemble the necessary components of a robot, including its body, power source, and programming. This process is often referred to as "growing" or "cooking" the robot. The "food" that is used is a combination of raw materials, such as metals and plastics, and specialized software and code. Through this process, identical robots can be created with precision and accuracy.

2. Is this similar to 3D printing?

In some ways, robotic reproduction can be compared to 3D printing. Both processes involve using a computer program to create a physical object. However, 3D printing typically uses one material, such as plastic, to create an object, while robotic reproduction involves assembling multiple components to create a complex machine.

3. Can robots reproduce on their own without human intervention?

Currently, robots are not capable of reproducing without human intervention. While there have been advancements in self-assembling robots, they still require human programming and supervision. However, in the future, it is possible that robots may have the ability to reproduce on their own.

4. Will robotic reproduction replace traditional manufacturing processes?

Robotic reproduction is still in its early stages and is not yet capable of replacing traditional manufacturing processes. While it has the potential to be more efficient and cost-effective, it still requires significant technological advancements and research. Additionally, there may be ethical and societal implications to consider before fully replacing traditional manufacturing processes with robotic reproduction.

5. What are the potential benefits of robotic reproduction?

There are several potential benefits of robotic reproduction. It could lead to more efficient and cost-effective production of complex machines, such as robots and other advanced technologies. It could also reduce the need for human labor in manufacturing processes, potentially leading to a higher quality of life for workers. Additionally, it could open up new possibilities for space exploration and other industries that require precise and advanced machinery.

Similar threads

  • Biology and Medical
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
9
Views
949
  • General Discussion
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Biology and Medical
Replies
6
Views
3K
  • Sci-Fi Writing and World Building
Replies
24
Views
770
Replies
4
Views
1K
  • Programming and Computer Science
Replies
1
Views
1K
Replies
10
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
1K
Back
Top