Rocket experiment analysis

In summary, the height of the rocket calculated using formulas was very off from the real height of the rocket figured out by calculating the tangent of the angle of altitude. The angle was 40degrees. The height I got using formulas ( first figuring out max kinetic energy then gravitational energy, then total energy, then the height) was 1127 while the one using distance measured from the rocket's highest point to where the altitude was measured and tan of 40 was 82:eek: yah i know the two numbers aren't close at all. So we have to discuss why the result is so off. Reasons other than things like human errors... maybe something like wind? i just can't figure it out well...T.T
  • #1
jnimagine
178
0
we fired off a rocket in physics class and we have to write a report about it.
I found out that the height of the rocket calculated using formulas was very off from the real height of the rocket figured out by calculating the tangent of the angle of altitude. (there was an altitude person who measured the angle to the height of the rocket when it was fired off) That angle was 40degrees. The height I got using formulas ( first figuring out max kinetic energy then gravitational energy, then total energy, then the height) was 1127 while the one using distance measured from the rocket's highest point to where the altitude was measured and tan of 40 was 82:eek: yah i know the two numbers aren't close at all.
So we have to discuss why the result is so off. Reasons other than things like human errors... maybe something like wind? i just can't figure it out well...T.T

Thank you for your help
 
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  • #2
how did you measure inicial velocity?
Remember too that not all kinetic energy is transferred to potencial energy due to the loses in real life experiments.
 
  • #3
Even excluding wind, there's a lot of aerodynamic drag, friction from the launch pad (if you use a stand-up guide that the rocket runs up), and just general efficiency losses because the numbers are usually based upon ideal circumstances which aren't encountered in real life.
 
  • #4
Work with your uncertainties and errors, see if its within range. no use talking absolutes.
 
  • #5
well we just assumed the initial velocity as 0m/s...
 
  • #6
student85 said:
how did you measure inicial velocity?
Remember too that not all kinetic energy is transferred to potencial energy due to the loses in real life experiments.

hey student85
thanks for the reply
um... we just assumed the initial velocity as 0m/s...
could u explain more about kinetic not always changing to potential??
where would the energy go if it doesn't get transferred to potential??
 
  • #7
Danger said:
Even excluding wind, there's a lot of aerodynamic drag, friction from the launch pad (if you use a stand-up guide that the rocket runs up), and just general efficiency losses because the numbers are usually based upon ideal circumstances which aren't encountered in real life.

ya we used the stand-up guide launch pad
so if there's friction formed there, how would u explain that friction caused the height to be different?
and um... about aerodynamic drag... do u mean just the gravity that's pulling down on the rocket?
and also like student 85 said what are some examples of efficiency losses? and how would this make the calculation of the height to be so wrong?? :confused:
i know I'm posting thousand questions at u guys
but I'd really appreciate it if u could answer these questions for me
thanx~ :smile:
 

Related to Rocket experiment analysis

1. What are the steps involved in analyzing a rocket experiment?

The steps involved in analyzing a rocket experiment may vary depending on the specific experiment, but generally involve collecting data, organizing and interpreting the data, and drawing conclusions based on the results.

2. How do you calculate the velocity and acceleration of a rocket?

To calculate the velocity of a rocket, you can use the formula v = d/t, where v is velocity, d is distance, and t is time. To calculate acceleration, you can use the formula a = (vf - vi)/t, where a is acceleration, vf is final velocity, vi is initial velocity, and t is time.

3. What are some common variables that may affect the results of a rocket experiment?

Some common variables that may affect the results of a rocket experiment include air resistance, wind speed and direction, the weight and design of the rocket, and the amount of thrust provided by the rocket's engines.

4. How can you use graphs to analyze rocket experiment data?

Graphs can be helpful in visually representing the data collected from a rocket experiment. For example, a line graph can show the relationship between distance and time, while a bar graph can compare the performance of different rockets. These graphs can make it easier to identify patterns and trends in the data.

5. What are some potential sources of error in a rocket experiment?

Potential sources of error in a rocket experiment may include human error in recording data, variations in weather conditions, and mechanical malfunctions of the rocket or its components. It is important to carefully control and monitor these factors to minimize their impact on the experiment results.

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