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Rockwell test

  1. Mar 20, 2006 #1
    Im doing a project and i did some test with AL using the Rockwell/Vickers machine and I was wondering if the units i have are in Kg and if they are I need to pick a unit to change them to so i can have a scale what should I use. my teacher was saying something about using the K value for the scale. What is that and how do I find it.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 21, 2006 #2

    brewnog

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    Are you from Sheffield sir?
     
  4. Mar 21, 2006 #3

    brewnog

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    And to answer your question, no the units are not in kg.

    The Rockwell number is expressed as N - h/S, where h is the permanent indentation depth in mm, and N and S are constants specific to the type of test being performed. The two most common measurements are Rockwell B and C (HRB & HRC).

    Values of N and S for HRB are 130 and 0.002 respectively, using a hardened steel ball and 100kg test load
    Values of N and S for HRC are 100 and 0.002 respectively, using a 120 degree angle diamond cone, and 150kg test load


    Loads of info about it if you Google.

    http://www.npl.co.uk/force/guidance/hardness/rockwell.html
     
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