Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Roll your own Sushi

  1. Aug 25, 2009 #1
    A couple of months ago I bought a rice cooker to make rice for sushi. All the ingredients we found (well, my wife found) at the supermarket after a couple tries:

    To make cucumber and crab rolls for a first time we bought

    2 lb. white rice
    1.2 oz toasted seaweed wraps
    2 long cucumber
    8 oz. cooked crab meat

    and condiments:

    3.7 oz. toasted sesame seeds
    12 oz. pickled ginger
    1 oz. wasabi
    10 oz. low sodium soy sauce

    We estimated about 25 dollars total food cost, and the two of us have been snacking on rice rolls for 5 days now.

    There are a few tricks like handling the rice with damp hands or it won’t stick to your fingers, and use your sharpest knife and a slow hand to cut the through the seaweed wrapper. But I managed to make some acceptable rolls by the third try without a rolling mat which we failed to find at the supermarket.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2009 #2

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Hmm...don't really know that I would eat 5-day-old seafood, but knock yourself out, haha.

    That actually sounds like something I'd like to try. So you used regular, long-grain white rice? I always thought they use a special kind in sushi, like jasmine, or....?
     
  4. Aug 25, 2009 #3
    Pfffft, I get mine free at the gas station with a fill up.
     
  5. Aug 25, 2009 #4

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I have the gear to make Sushi but have not done it yet. I am really interested in Nigiri (salmon), but the effort required to get sushi-grade raw salmon is putting me off. At the local fish store, it's only good on two days of the week. And that's often not the day I'm going to have a party...
     
  6. Aug 25, 2009 #5

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Rice for sushi has to be washed for a long time. Place the raw rice in a colander and rinse under cold running water for at least 5 minutes while stirring with your hand. Then the rice is carefully mixed with vinegar.
     
  7. Aug 25, 2009 #6

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    So you can use any rice, as long as it's rinsed long enough? And what kind of vinegar?
     
  8. Aug 25, 2009 #7
    You're supposed to use japanese sticky rice, the most common one is calrose but I am not sure if there is a type that is considered better for sushi than calrose. Long grain rice, basmati, and such will not stick together properly for making sushi. I am not particularly familiar with making sushi but I grew up in a half japanese family. You are supposed to rinse calrose to get rid of dirt and wash away some of the starch (which makes it sticky) so it doesn't turn into mush. You need some of that starch though unless their is some other way of keeping the rice sticky that I am unaware of. Usually with calrose I rinse it (add water swirl around and drain) about three or four times just for normal use.
     
  9. Aug 25, 2009 #8
    You wouldn't believe some of the lengths you can go to to wash the rice, which is one thing I stumbled upon myself. It takes a lot of water, and one recommended operation is to rub the rice together to "polish" it.

    I had no idea about the vinegar. I just read about it earlier tonight, which I imagine is a weak rice vinegar. The vinegar is combined with sugar and agar (I think) and other stuff. Even without all the extra care, it turned out very well.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2009
  10. Aug 25, 2009 #9
    I bought diamond long grain white rice. Apparently you should use one year aged, medium or short grained for best results. Koreans call it sticky rice.

    And yeah, come to think about it, the crab has reached it's experation date. We bought Blue Swimming Crab, whatever that is. Next time, Alaskan king crab.

    Where could you find flying fish eggs?
     
  11. Aug 25, 2009 #10

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I know this one.

    I saw flying fish eggs in front of the face of my teenager when he discovered he had a mouthful of fish eggs.
     
  12. Aug 26, 2009 #11
    check to see if you have any local "asian marts" or similar in the area, that's where I got mine
     
  13. Aug 26, 2009 #12
    rolling sushi without a mat? never tried that, niiice :approve:

    I buy the rice in a packet that says "sushi rice" on the front, pretty handy. Then I also use a vinegar called "sushi vinegar", which is often nect to the rice and the seaweed wraps in the store. The vinegar can be made using rice vinegar and sugar and salt.

    You can also use surimi sticks instead of crab, it's cheaper and in a good size format. Tuna or salmon can be used, we often used smoked salmon for our friends that aren't so fond of raw fish. A nice additive is a stripe of mayo or cream cheese in the middle of the rolls.

    Some great videos on the net on how to make different types. I used it to find out how to make fashion sandwiches (rice on the outside). Maki and nigiri were getting too easy and I needed more variation on the plate.
     
  14. Aug 26, 2009 #13

    Danger

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

    I tried rolling sushi once, and realized that it's a useless endeavour. I used everything from safety matches to an acetylene torch, and you just can't light the ****ing stuff. Some idiot sitting near me finally gave up and ate the ****! :yuck:
    By they bye, I have half a dozen rice cookers. They're called 'pots'.
     
  15. Aug 26, 2009 #14

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I have two problems with making my own sushi rolls. First, as others have mentioned, finding sushi grade fish in a land-locked state is a rather sketchy endeavor. The other problem is that even if I found the fish, or just made pseudo-sushi with something like cooked crab, I haven't found seaweed wrappers I like. Unless I'm supposed to do something else to the wrappers that I don't know about, the ones in the stores are overwhelmingly strong tasting, like the seaweed was gathered only after it had been sitting out rotting on the rocks on shore for a week. When I get sushi in restaurants, the wraps have a much milder flavor that doesn't interfere with the other flavors in them.

    Oh, who am I kidding, if I ever got my paws on sushi grade fish of any kind here, it would never make it into a roll. I'm much more of a fan of sashimi, so would just be chomping on the fish before it ever got into anything else (I need to find out how to arrange to come back as a bear in my next life so I can enjoy freshly-caught salmon straight from the stream). At most, I might make regular sushi, where I set some thin slices on rice. I'd never waste it in a roll where it's harder to taste the individual fish flavors. (Yes, I'm pretty sure I'm mostly carnivore...I have an extra set of pointy teeth to prove it. :biggrin:)
     
  16. Aug 26, 2009 #15

    Ben Niehoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I guess I feel lucky living in a place like LA...we have tons of Asian markets where you can get everything you need, including fresh fish. I haven't tried making sushi at home yet, though.

    By the way, most California rolls (even in restaurants) are made from imitation crab rather than real crab. I do encourage trying real crab, of course, but if you're satisfied with what you get in restaurants, you might want to give imitation crab a try, as I would expect it to last longer before expiration.
     
  17. Aug 26, 2009 #16
    We make sushi all the time! A while back I had scalded my hand something horrible the day before we were to have a party, so my 14 year old got to prep and roll ALL the sushi all by herself. She was very proud of herself.

    For Moonbear and those that don't have local sushi grade fish, I have heard you can substitute lox for some recipes, but we haven't tried that yet. Even though we have an AWESOME Japanese/Asian market, I still haven't had the nerve to try their sashimi fish. We just stick to California rolls or vegan rolls, or cooked scallops and shrimp.....

    I can't imagine rolling without a mat...
     
  18. Aug 26, 2009 #17

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Evo?? Is that you??
     
  19. Aug 26, 2009 #18

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I wouldn't substitute lox. I like lox, but it has its own place, which is not sushi. Lox belongs on a bagel with cream cheese and onions, or served with those little itty bitty bread slices and a sprinkle of capers and onions.

    And, sorry folks, but California rolls are NOT sushi. If the fish is cooked, it's not sushi, it's just some Americanized concoction for wimps. I know it's imitation crab in them, which is why I wouldn't even consider wasting my time making them. Not that you could taste the crab amidst everything else anyway.
     
  20. Aug 26, 2009 #19

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Yay lox! Food of the Gods. My toes are curling just thinking about lox.

    Concurrence. California rolls are to real sushi what ... um ah ... fake food is to real food.
    Sorry, my metaphor muscle is tired.
     
  21. Aug 26, 2009 #20

    Ben Niehoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    And dill! Don't forget the dill. And creme fraiche is way better than cream cheese.

    I agree, but since the OP described making California rolls, and then complained about them expiring, I made the suggestion.

    Actually, come to think of it:

    - Rolls with the rice on the outside are not sushi
    - Rolls with pieces too big to fit in your mouth are not sushi
    - Fish and rice doused in spicy sauce is not sushi

    These things are also American concoctions. Sushi flavors are supposed to be subtle so that you can taste the fish. However, I do love spicy sauce and wasabi.

    Some kinds of sushi ARE cooked, actually, such as octopus and eel.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Roll your own Sushi
  1. Creating your own (Replies: 9)

  2. For Your Own Good (Replies: 7)

Loading...