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Roman Emperors and Empire

  1. Sep 18, 2005 #1

    Astronuc

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    A good start - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_Emperor

    September 18, 96: Nerva was appointed by the Senate to become Roman Emperor, the first of the Five Good Emperors.

    Marcus Cocceius Nerva (November 8, 30 AD–January 27, 98), Roman emperor (AD 96–98), was a member of the Italian nobility rather than one of the elite of Rome; in this he was like Vespasian, the founder of the Flavian dynasty.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nerva

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Good_Emperors
     
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  3. Sep 18, 2005 #2

    arildno

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  4. Sep 18, 2005 #3

    Evo

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    I love Fordham's Ancient History Sourcebook. :!!) I've spent many hours there.

    Astronuc, Wikipedia is fine if you just want to look up names and dates and a very condensed summary of events, but the entire Roman Empire reduced to 15 minutes of text? :wink:
     
  5. Sep 18, 2005 #4

    arildno

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    Fordham is great. :smile:
     
  6. Sep 18, 2005 #5

    Astronuc

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    This is true, but it's a good place to start.

    I think it would take many moons to track down all the websites and determine the quality.

    I did not know of the Fordam site. I wonder, there must be more like that at other universities?

    Another university site on Roman History (Roman Internet Resources) - http://www.wsu.edu:8080/~dee/ROMINRES.HTM

    There is this one - De Imperatoribus Romanis: An Online Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors

    list of Roman Emperors incomplete

    Roman Emperors (27 BC-491 AD) - http://www.britannia.com/history/resource/emperor.html


    Then there is an interesting site, which I have yet to peruse, but the history of Romania and Rome is quite interesting:
    ROME AND ROMANIA (27 BC-1453 AD) - http://www.friesian.com/romania.htm
    Emperors of the Roman and the so-called Byzantine Empires; Princes, Kings, and Tsars of Numidia, Judaea, Bulgaria, Serbia, Wallachia, & Moldavia; and the Sultâns of Rûm

    I don't know how much each site collects information from others, and clearly it is hard to tell if anything has been peer-reviewed. I would imagine university sites are generally peer-reviewed.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 21, 2017
  7. Sep 18, 2005 #6

    Evo

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    Yes, it's a great way to get your feet wet and when you find something of particular interest, you can then research it farther.

    I like both - the short compilations and reading the translated works of the actual historians.

    Here are two resources for Roman history that are very user friendly and both are good for people that enjoy reading about history, but don't have much time, like me.

    For a beginner, this site has some good information and is indexed well. I do not have enough knowledge to judge how accurate it is, but so far the info I've found holds up. Besides, where else can you get a card cut-out Roman legionary helmet to wear? :biggrin:

    http://www.roman-empire.net/index.html

    This site has been helpful http://www.historyworld.net/default.asp
     
  8. Sep 18, 2005 #7
  9. Sep 18, 2005 #8

    Evo

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  10. Sep 18, 2005 #9

    Evo

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    Last edited: Sep 18, 2005
  11. Sep 23, 2005 #10

    marcus

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    I agree, arildno :smile:

    also I tend to think that the most important information about the first dozen Emperors is contained in Suetonius, who is especially valuable because of his lack of bias and careful accuracy about details, do you not think so? :wink:
     
    Last edited: Sep 23, 2005
  12. Sep 24, 2005 #11

    arildno

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    Eeh, I would rather have said that Suetonius provides the most entertaining information about the first emperors.
    Entertainment is, however, without doubt very important..
     
  13. Oct 5, 2005 #12

    Astronuc

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    (Wikipedia) October 6, 105 BC: The Cimbri and the Teutons inflicted a major defeat on the Roman Republic in the Battle of Arausio.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Arausio

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cimbri -
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teutons -
     
  14. Dec 18, 2006 #13

    Astronuc

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  15. Dec 18, 2006 #14

    ranger

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    So many great links. I love studying how ancient civilizations lived. I'm particularly taking a liking to the Greeks. But nevertheless, I enjoy reading all... Thanks for all these awesome links everyone!

    I had no idea that this sub forum existed, until "Roman...Empire" caught my eyes..lol.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2006
  16. Jan 7, 2007 #15

    Astronuc

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  17. Jan 8, 2007 #16

    Astronuc

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    The Roman Empire - http://history.boisestate.edu/westciv/empire/ [Broken]
    from
    History of Western Civilization
    E.L. Skip Knox
    Boise State University
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  18. Apr 19, 2008 #17

    Astronuc

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    Peter Heather's - The Fall of the Roman Empire

    I'm reading Peter Heather's more recent (c. 2006) review of the decline of the Roman Empire, and it's an excellent overview. Heather is a contemporary historian of European/Roman antiquity. While it provides some background of first three centuries, the majority book covers the 4th, 5th and 6th centuries CE.

    Two author/hitorians on which Heather relies are Ammianus Marcellinus and Olympiodorus (of Thebes). Here are some online sources about these two authors.

    Ammianus

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ammianus_Marcellinus

    http://www.tertullian.org/fathers/index.htm#Ammianus_Marcellinus

    http://odur.let.rug.nl/~drijvers/ammianus/index.htm (The Ammianus Marcellinus Online Project)

    http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ammianus.html

    Ancient History Sourcebook:
    Ammianus Marcellinus (330-395 CE):
    The Battle of Hadrianopolis, 378 CE
    http://www.fordham.edu/HALSALL/ANCIENT/378adrianople.html


    Olympiodorus

    http://www.enotes.com/classical-medieval-criticism/olympiodorus-thebes [Broken]
    Olympiodorus of Thebes c. 375-c. 430

    http://www.vortigernstudies.org.uk/artsou/olympio.htm

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympiodorus_of_Thebes

    http://books.google.com/books?id=g7-AteT1eZIC&pg=PT82&lpg=PT82&dq=olympiodorus&source=web&ots=rONkBsBHDO&sig=DFmOFpeDfyoKAXevjzV0NXEziYk&hl=en [Broken]


    It's really hard to find good resources on the internet - still! :grumpy:



    The battle of Adrianople (Hadrianople - now Edirne, Turkey) in 378, is considered by many to be a turning point for the Roman Empire. The Goths (Tervingi and Greuthungi) and some Alan and Hun allies migrated into the Balkans and never left. The Eastern Emperor, Valens, was killed and the Roman army lost a considerable force. Over the next 30 years, the Tervingi (who apparently became Visigoths) made their way to the Italian peninsula. The Greuthungi (who may have become the Ostrogoths) followed later.

    Meanwhile, various tribes Vandals, Alans, Suevi and Alamanni migrated across the Rhine. The Burgundians migrated to Worms (on the Rhine) by 412. All this was apparently a response to the Hunnic invasion from Central Asia.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  19. Aug 26, 2008 #18

    Astronuc

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    Huge statue of Roman ruler found

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7580745.stm
    Also - Head of Roman empress unearthed
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7560833.stm

    Statue of Hadrian - http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6939024.stm

    Excavation at Sagalassos - http://www.archaeology.org/interactive/sagalassos/
     
  20. Aug 29, 2008 #19

    Astronuc

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    Heads up for this book. I don't know much about it yet.

    Rome and the Barbarians: The Dawn of a New World (Hardcover)
    by Jean-Jacques Aillagon

    Sounds interesting.
     
  21. Aug 30, 2008 #20

    mheslep

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    Anything in Aillagon or Heather on the theory that the Roman's slowly poisoned themselves, lead in water or some such?
     
  22. Aug 30, 2008 #21

    Astronuc

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    Aillagon's book is not out yet, and Heather concentrates on the pressures of the various barbarian groups in the Western Roman Empire, but did not mention anything about the immediate environment. I'm sure there are books on Roman metropolitan society and the impact of lead on those society.

    Here are a couple of webpages on this subject:
    http://ces.ca.uky.edu/energy/lead/rome_lead.htm [Broken]
    http://penelope.uchicago.edu/~grout/encyclopaedia_romana/wine/leadpoisoning.html


    I read recently the fertility in Roman society was significantly reduced in the first (and perhaps second) century CE.

    Ostensibly, the bases of the Western Roman Empire, Rome, and Eastern Roman (Byzantine) Empire, Constantinople, shared similar infrastructure, but the Eastern Empire continued, if not flourished, while the Western Empire disintegrated. So it's not clear that lead poisoning was a major factor, although it certainly could have been a factor.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  23. Aug 30, 2008 #22

    Evo

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    Here is a good article on lead usage in ancient Rome.

    Although the Romans may have ingested a lot of lead, look at these figures for Americans.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 3, 2017
  24. Aug 30, 2008 #23

    HallsofIvy

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    Evo, "consuming" lead in the sense of using it is not the same as "ingesting" it! It would among other things depend on HOW it was used. I remember reading that the Romans used lead plate to make water pipes because it was easily malleable.
     
  25. Aug 30, 2008 #24

    Evo

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    :rofl: I mistook "usage rate". Thanks for pointing that out Halls! No more posting before my first cup of coffee!
     
  26. Aug 30, 2008 #25

    Astronuc

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    I read the higher usage rate as a indicating a higher potential for ingestion, not the amount ingested.

    Certainly the Roman used lead (plumbum) to make pipes, and that would likely have resulted in lead-contaminated water.

    However, in the US and industrial world, lead was used in plumbing solders and packing segment wasted lines. I know this personally from having replaced plumbing and waste/sewage lines. I had to use a chisel to remove the lead from waste drain lines.

    There used to be leaded-gasoline (tetra-ethyl lead as an antiknock agent). Also lead weights for fishing lines, lead counter-weights, lead bullets, lead jewelry, lead drinking vessels, . . . . Only since about the 1970's do I remember a crackdown on heavy metals in the environment.


    The reference to fertility (or rather reproduction) in Rome of the 1st and 2nd century is cited in the Politically Incorrect Guide to Western Civilization, Chapter 2 (Rome: An Empire of Tradition and Patriarchy), p. 41, which cites Jerome Carcopino, Daily Life in Acient Rome, which states ". . . , many Roman marriages at the end of the first and the beginning of the second century were childless."

    Jérôme Carcopino, Daily Life in Ancient Rome: The People and the City at the Height of the Empire. Edited and annotated by Henry T. Rowell. Translated by E. O. Lorimer. Second Edition with a new Introduction and Bibliographic Essay by Mary Beard. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2003. Pp. xix, 346.
    http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr/2004/2004-03-23.html
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2008
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