Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Roommate that gets allowance

  1. Oct 23, 2006 #1
    Well, i had a roommate that gets allowance( 70dollars/week) from his( he is 24 years old) parents. i do not know if it would be acceptable to ask him questions regarding his allowance. Do any of you get "allownces" from your parents? what amount, and how frequent do they give it to you. When should parents stop give allowance to their child anyway? How old is old enough to stop receiving allowances?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 23, 2006 #2

    brewnog

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    No I don't. You could ask him questions about it, but don't be surprised if he gets ratty with you for being nosey. It's up to the parents, if they have the means to help him out then fair play.
     
  4. Oct 23, 2006 #3

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Why would it matter to you?
     
  5. Oct 23, 2006 #4
    I am 43 years old and both of my parents are deceased and I miss them dearly.
    When I was younger my parents never bought me a car. I stopped reveiving an allowance when I got my first paper route. In my opinion, a 24 year old should not be receiving money from his/her parents unless he/she is in college. Even if this is the case, he or she should get a part time job to help relieve some of the burden he/she is putting on his parents.
    If he or she is paying the bills on time then you shouldn't butt into his or her financial business
     
  6. Oct 23, 2006 #5
    The only way I could see my parents paying is if I was in serious financial trouble. Which I think is ok. Im not so sure about an allowance in college. I stopped recieving one when i was 12 or 13 which wasnt too long ago, then I got a job so i could pay for what I have to. But look at it this way. Now you know how to work and get money when you need it. Whats going to happen when your roomates parents wont be there for a job interview or something, Im betting hed have a harder time because he didnt learn as early. Just my thoughts.

    -Steve
     
  7. Oct 23, 2006 #6
    Why do you find the need to know?
     
  8. Oct 23, 2006 #7

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Because of your question
    It would depend on why you want to know.
     
  9. Oct 23, 2006 #8

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Evo is trying to indicate that the allowance is a personal matter between your roommate and his parents. We don't know how close you are to your roommate. So why would you concerned about his allowance? An allowance from your parents is between you and your parents.

    Some parents do choose to subsidize their children, and some wealthy parents lavish their children with money, expensive gifts, vacations, trips overseas, and so on. I have seen parents buy houses for their children.

    I expect my children to work in order to support themselves. I received allowance until about 14 when I started working for a wage. I also was expected to work for my parents, so the allowance was earned. I also paid for my college education, and I helped my parents support my sibblings.
     
  10. Oct 23, 2006 #9

    JasonRox

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    I agree.

    I don't get allowances, but I know of many students who do. It doesn't bother me at all. If the parents have the means to help, then it's up to them to choose whether or not they want to help.
     
  11. Oct 23, 2006 #10

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That seems odd to still be getting an allowance at 24. You should be supporting yourself by then.

    I never really got an allowance, except when I was really little and got something like 50 cents a week to stick in my piggy bank. Then again, until I left for college, my parents bought anything I needed (NOT anything I wanted). Once I was in college, they'd help out here and there with book money or tuition, but for anything else I needed, I had to earn the money by then. By 24, I was helping them out, and couldn't imagine accepting an allowance at that age. I thought it was odd enough that I had a friend who still lived home with his parents at that age.
     
  12. Oct 23, 2006 #11
    I read a story in the NYT not too long ago saying this is actually a fairly common practice now (adult children receiving an allowance). With rents consuming more and more of everyone's budget, it is becoming harder for those with entry level jobs to liv on their own, especially in cities. So the parents often help out.

    The proportion of adult children living with their parents has also skyrocketed. I don't recall the figure, but I do recall thinking it was an order of magnitude larger than I would have guessed. Off the top of my head, it was something like 25% of people age 30-40 live with their parents.

    Now, that may include a lot of cases where the parents have retired and moved in with the children, but most 30-40 year olds' parents probably haven't retired.
     
  13. Oct 23, 2006 #12

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    If you can't support yourself even with a job, it's time to relocate to someplace more affordable. That, or adjust to the idea that roaches are cheap pets. I think it's becoming more common for young adults to be trying to live well above their means...they seem to think they can just jump right into a first home just like what they grew up in and not that they need to start out small and cheap and work their way up, just like their parents did.

    And I wouldn't expect the number of parents retiring and moving in with their children would be what's skyrocketing anyway. My parents are due in town tomorrow, and I'm dreading having to spend a full day with them on Wednesday; I cannot imagine trying to live with them full-time! :surprised
     
  14. Oct 23, 2006 #13

    I am curious about people.. as well as many other things
     
  15. Oct 23, 2006 #14

    Math Is Hard

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I got an allowance until I was 15. The bulk of it was allocated for lunch money at my high school cafeteria. When I turned 16, I got a job.
     
  16. Oct 23, 2006 #15
  17. Oct 23, 2006 #16

    Astronuc

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    My wife works with a woman in her early 50's, a divorcee, who lives with her parents and her sister. My daughter told me of someone she met in his 50's, who still lives with his parents, and has never married.

    Apparently, due to high cost of living, there are many 20-, 30- and 40-somethings who live with their parents.

    I would never live with my parents again - as much as I love them. I left home at 17 and never looked back. Besides I have kids of my own to raise - with the expectation that they will be self-sufficient. :biggrin:

    And when they are out the door, I'll probably move to the other side of the planet. :biggrin:
     
  18. Oct 23, 2006 #17
    I'm 19 and I get allowance. (I have a part-time job during school, and ideally a full-time job otherwise.) Where I'm from, it's perfectly natural for your parents to take care of you financially until you get your degree. Then it's your turn to work your ass off so they can retire with luxury.

    As an aside, living with your parents isn't that big of a deal back home, either. I don't get why it's considered 'wrong' in America, and elsewhere.
     
  19. Oct 23, 2006 #18

    JasonRox

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    First, it's not as easy anymore. Job openings aren't sitting everywhere.

    My dad tells me about having no education and making lots of money. That's rarely possible today, unless you consider $20,000 a lot of money.

    Second, tuition is no doubt higher today.

    Third, I can accept the idea that students are now living beyond what they can afford.

    Fourth, parents do not want their kids to start over. They want to keep the "wealth" earned in the family or bring it higher. Supporting the kids through school is a way of helping them maintain that.

    Fifth, times have changed and now we don't move out right away.

    I have no idea what the story is with the 24 year old, but I really don't see the problem.

    I'm 23 and still live at home. I have school to pay for and books, or basically anything I want. My mom provides me with food and shelter. Good food and shelter no doubt!

    Thanks, to my mom, doors of opportunities are opening. Like, my new TA job. That wouldn't have happened if I had to pay for everything. In fact, I probably wouldn't be in school. A possible NSERC Research Grant would have to be lost. I also wouldn't be writing for the school newspaper. So many things that's helping me go further, so why would my mom just stop and watch me rot? Because that's life? Hmmm... I totally disagree.
     
  20. Oct 23, 2006 #19
    I still get an allowance but then again I am only 18. I get $50 a weeK from my parents plus $70 for babysitting a girl around the corner and then $1500 a year from my grandparents if I do well in my studies (so every year)
     
  21. Oct 23, 2006 #20

    JasonRox

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    That's not allowance.

    Parents pay you for being good. :tongue2:

    Babysitting is a job. :approve:

    Grandparents give scholarships. :biggrin:
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Roommate that gets allowance
  1. Roommate attraction (Replies: 36)

  2. Roommate Issues (Replies: 23)

Loading...