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Rotational motion

  • Thread starter SDTK
  • Start date
30
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1. Homework Statement

this is a question just to help with my understanding: ....

when Torque (kg m^2/s^2) and the Moment of Inertia (kg m^2) are known and used to find angular acceleration, .... T(net)/I, are the units for the resulting acceleration rad/s^2

Thanks :-)

2. Homework Equations
##\tau = I \alpha##

3. The Attempt at a Solution
Example:
t = 12 kg m^2/s^2
I = 3.00 kg m^2

angular acceleration = torque/I = 12 kg m^2/s^2 / 3.00 kg m^2 = 4 units(?) / s^2
 
Last edited by a moderator:

gneill

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Yes. Angular acceleration is given in radians per second squared ##(rad/s^2)##.

The radian is sort of a "unitless unit" that appears and disappears as required when working with angular quantities. It's based on a ratio of lengths from the unit circle, where an angle is defined via the arclength along the circle divided by the radius length. It serves to distinguish a quantity as being angular in nature.
 
30
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thank you! :-)
 

gneill

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How about "dimensionless unit"?
Sure! That's probably better nomenclature. :smile:
 

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