Rotor Inertia Impact on Braking Loads - MKSA 1,333kgm^2

In summary, the rotor inertia can have an influence on the acceleration of the rotors when a dynamic braking load is applied, but not when a constant torque is applied.
  • #1
willeng
3
0
We have two rotors & the rotor inertia combined is (MKSA) 1,333kgm^2 from the manufacturers specifications.

My question is, if we apply a braking load to the rotors while acellerating them what influence does the rotor inertia then have on things?

Just say we have a braking load of 100ft/lbs or 200ft/lbs etc on the rotors & we acellerate them to say 700rpm or 1000rpm in 1 second or 2 seconds etc, what influence then does the rotor inertia have. Or does the rotor inertia get canceled out because we are dragging a brake sort of thing & the inertia value just becomes part of the braking load & not a separate issue?

I can see if the braking load is very small the rotor inertia will have an effect while acellerating the rotors but when the braking load is high i am just not sure how this effects things?.

Some equations for working the effects out would be very useful if someone could help me out!

Thanks
 
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  • #2
in advance.The effect of the rotor inertia will depend on the type of braking load applied. If the braking load is a constant torque, then the rotor inertia will have no effect on the acceleration of the rotors. However, if the braking load is a dynamic force, then the rotor inertia will play a role in how quickly the rotors accelerate. The equation that describes this is: a = (F - Jα)/J, where a is the acceleration, F is the braking force, J is the combined rotor inertia, and α is the angular acceleration.
 
  • #3
for your question. Rotor inertia does have an impact on braking loads, as it affects the overall mass and rotational speed of the rotors. When a braking load is applied, the rotors will experience a decrease in rotational speed and a corresponding increase in torque. The rotor inertia will resist this change in speed, causing the braking load to have to work against it. This can result in a longer deceleration time and potentially higher braking loads.

To calculate the effects of rotor inertia on braking loads, you can use the equation:

Braking torque = rotor inertia x angular acceleration

This equation takes into account the mass and rotational speed of the rotors, as well as the time it takes to decelerate.

In the case of a high braking load, the rotor inertia will still have an impact, but it may be less noticeable due to the overall magnitude of the braking load. However, it is still an important factor to consider in order to ensure safe and efficient braking.

Additionally, the design and materials of the rotors can also affect their inertia and thus their impact on braking loads. For example, a rotor with a higher inertia may take longer to decelerate, but it may also have a higher heat capacity and be better able to withstand high braking loads without warping or deforming.

In summary, rotor inertia does play a role in braking loads and should be taken into consideration when designing and testing braking systems. By using equations and considering the specific parameters of the rotors, you can accurately assess the effects of rotor inertia on braking loads and make informed decisions for your braking system design.
 

Related to Rotor Inertia Impact on Braking Loads - MKSA 1,333kgm^2

1. How does rotor inertia impact braking loads?

Rotational inertia, or the resistance of an object to changes in its rotational motion, affects braking loads by influencing the amount of energy that must be dissipated during braking. A higher rotor inertia results in a greater amount of kinetic energy that must be absorbed by the brakes, leading to increased braking loads.

2. What is the significance of MKSA 1,333kgm^2 in relation to rotor inertia?

MKSA 1,333kgm^2 is a unit of measurement used to quantify the rotor inertia of a system. It represents the mass of the rotor multiplied by the square of its radius, and is used to calculate the amount of energy required to change the rotational motion of the rotor. A higher MKSA value indicates a greater resistance to changes in rotation and therefore a higher impact on braking loads.

3. How does rotor inertia impact brake system design?

The amount of rotor inertia in a system is an important factor to consider in brake system design. A higher rotor inertia means that the brakes must be able to handle a greater amount of energy during braking, which may require stronger or more durable components. Additionally, the size and weight of the brake system may need to be adjusted to accommodate for the increased braking loads.

4. Can rotor inertia be adjusted in a braking system?

In most cases, the rotor inertia of a system is determined by the design and specifications of the components. However, in some cases, it may be possible to adjust the rotor inertia by changing the size or weight of the rotor. This should be done carefully and with consideration for the overall impact on the braking system.

5. What other factors can impact braking loads besides rotor inertia?

While rotor inertia is a significant factor in determining braking loads, there are other factors that can also have an impact. These include the speed and weight of the vehicle, the type and condition of the braking system, and external factors such as road conditions or weather. It is important to consider all of these factors when designing a braking system to ensure safe and efficient operation.

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