S&S: Please help me understand the convolution!

  • #26
1,309
19
This is interesting... At my school we have only 1 quarter of circuits, and we have a quarter of signals/system that is completely separate.

I'm guessing it might be better to teach it in the context of something like circuits, in order to give the students something tangible to latch on to. Oppenheim lays it out almost purely as an abstract subject.... (which--being something of a math oriented fellow--I actually enjoy in a twisted sort of way :)

yeah, I had one 4 credit circuits 1 course and 1 3 credit circuits 2 course. These courses collectively covered all of the stuff on dc resistive networks, transient responses, capacitance, inductance, laplace transforms and s-domain analysis, system theory, fourier analysis and frequency response analysis, 2 port networks and many other things. But I never had a standalone systems class.
 
  • #27
rbj
2,227
9
Rbj,

Just curious... Are there any excellent introductory signals/linear systems books you would recommend?

i'm on the road at the moment.

i can only think of Oppenheim and Wilsky. there is another one by Orfanidis that has a nice connection to audio that i like.

dunno who else at the moment.
 
  • #29
Thanks for the links, FrogPad.

I've read through chapter 4 of Oppenheim so far... It's actually starting to grow on me. I think the Fourier analysis stuff is much easier to understand than the convolution was. (although I find the discrete side a bit more obscure than the continuous for some reason)

Also, I've been using the MIT opencourseware problem sets and solutions, which have been really useful for me. If anyone is interested, you can find them here:

http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Electrica...-Science/6-003Fall-2003/CourseHome/index.htm"

The solutions to the homework problems are written very well. Also, the class notes aren't bad.
 
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  • #30
87
0
study the convolution in more details

I want to study the convolution in more details. So if you can provide me by any link to find a brief study for the convolution.

thanks alot!
 
  • #31
809
0
I want to study the convolution in more details. So if you can provide me by any link to find a brief study for the convolution.

thanks alot!

More detail than what rbj posted?
 
  • #32
I want to study the convolution in more details. So if you can provide me by any link to find a brief study for the convolution.

Frogpad is right, you probably aren't going to find a better explanation that is as concise and to the point as what rbj posted. But here are some links anyway:

  • http://cnx.org/content/m11541/latest/" [Broken] of computing the convolution of two signals.
  • A pretty cool http://www.jhu.edu/~signals/convolve/index.html" [Broken] helping you gain a good visual intuition of the convolution. (continuous time)
  • Same "slider" for the http://www.jhu.edu/~signals/discreteconv2/index.html" [Broken]
  • You can also check out the EE 20 and EE 120 Lectures on the http://webcast.berkeley.edu/courses.php?semesterid=22" (I'm not sure exactly where in the videos he talks about the convolution, though.)
  • And of course there are the http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Electrica...-Science/6-003Fall-2003/CourseHome/index.htm" at the MIT Open Courseware site. (The homework solutions are exceptionally well written!)

But for a great derivation, I've found nothing better than what rbj posted here!
 
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  • #33
83
0
this is an amazing tutorial - thanks alot rbj
wolf of the steps - haven't i seen you somewhere? :P
 
  • #34
this is an amazing tutorial - thanks alot rbj
wolf of the steps - haven't i seen you somewhere? :P

Who me? You must be thinking of someone else. :biggrin:
 

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