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Salmonella & eggs

  1. Jan 25, 2009 #1

    Monique

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    Is there an increased (or maybe a decreased) risk of having salmonella in home-grown eggs? The reason I ask is that I have a box of very biological eggs that were given to me, the chickens are free-range. I have the impression that industrial chickens might be more tightly monitored for salmonella infection. Would there be an increased risk if I eat the home-grown eggs soft-boiled?
     
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  3. Jan 25, 2009 #2
    there has to be, doesn't there? I'm not saying its a huge increase, but there has to be an increased risk.
     
  4. Jan 25, 2009 #3

    wolram

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    I often eat eggs from a friends chickens, and when i make a cake i eat the left over raw batter.
     
  5. Jan 25, 2009 #4
    and we all know how healthy you are
     
  6. Jan 25, 2009 #5

    wolram

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    How are the legs?
     
  7. Jan 25, 2009 #6
    Salmonella bacteria are found in the gastrointestinal tracts of many species of animals, birds, reptiles, and humans.

    Wash them chicken droppins off the eggs, whether you see em or not.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2009
  8. Jan 25, 2009 #7

    Monique

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    The bacterium can also be inside the egg, infecting the yolk or white before the shell is formed.
     
  9. Jan 25, 2009 #8
    Why wash the chicken droppings?They are the tastiest bits.
     
  10. Jan 25, 2009 #9
    I would guess that the probability to get salmonella eggs is determined by random testing the end products. If there is no such testing for uncontrolled eggs, comparing risks is fairly hard. In any case I would recommend eating eggs well prepared. Are the eggs monitored in any way? Also what is a very biological egg?
     
  11. Jan 25, 2009 #10
    In the late 1980s Edwina Currie,health minister claimed that Britains eggs were infected with salmonella.Result- plummeting egg sales and enraged farmers.
     
  12. Jan 25, 2009 #11
    Surely cooking them kills the bacteria does it not?
     
  13. Jan 25, 2009 #12
    I don't eat raw or undercooked eggs from any source. The key temperature is 160 degrees, which can be obtained by frying for 4 to 5 minutes in a covered pan, scrambling until firm or boiling 7 minutes in the shell or 5 minutes poached.
    Many home produced eggs/chickens come from cleaner and healthier environments then mass produced ones.
     
  14. Jan 25, 2009 #13
    I like them raw and still attached to the chicken
     
  15. Jan 25, 2009 #14
    Watch this before deciding that industrial farm eggs are safer.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  16. Jan 25, 2009 #15
    the most painful thing about that, assuming you weren't a poultry farmer, was the sheer number of egg jokes made by the newspapers; she certainly had egg on her face anyway. :wink:

    Cook your eggs properly anyway and you have no worries.
     
  17. Jan 25, 2009 #16
    http://blog.nutritiondata.com/ndblog/2008/02/organic-free-ra.html
     
  18. Jan 25, 2009 #17

    mgb_phys

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    Although she was technically correct.

    Yes funny that - "it's totally untrue there is no salmonella, but make sure you cook the eggs properly or you will die"
     
  19. Jan 25, 2009 #18

    Monique

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    Eggs from such a source are not allowed in the Netherlands. Some producers smuggled them into cookies and other processed foods, but once awareness was raised they were forced to use eggs from a more friendly source.
    I really like my eggs soft-boiled.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 25, 2014
  20. Jan 25, 2009 #19
    Battery hens are more likely to carry many microbes because of the high population density. This increases the risk of disease, including Salmonella. In an effort to control the risk of infection, battery hens are fed antibiotics that free range chickens rarely receive. I think this may be the reason for the opening question. In answer, organic/free range hens are less likely to be infected with salmonella and other pathogenic bacteria, so they are not routinely treated with antibiotics. So, the risk of salmonella from free range eggs is pretty low.
     
  21. Jan 25, 2009 #20
    I don't think as long as your eggs are properly refrigerated and used before the sell/use by date you are at much risk from soft boiled eggs, provided they are cooked properly. I don't know for sure and can only say I've been eating them that way for years with no adverse effects.
     
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