Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Sattelite shadows

  1. May 1, 2009 #1
    Another noob qeustion that I do not have the knowledge to figure out.

    It's is possible to see the shadow of a sattilte?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. May 1, 2009 #2

    mgb_phys

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    You mean an artificial satellite, rather than the moon (in astronomy moons are properly called satellites)
    The sun has an angular diameter of around 0.5 degree so the shadow will form a cone with an angle of 0.5 deg.
    Say a satellite is 2-3m across (eg Hubble) then the cone will be 500m long (easy to see if you draw a sketch)
    So unless you are in orbit less than 500m from the satellite - no you wont see a shadow
     
  4. May 1, 2009 #3
    oh , thats amazing, the sun is far larger,
    *draws out sketch* troginnometry ^.^
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Sattelite shadows
  1. Shadows of our time (Replies: 3)

  2. In the shadow of the Sun (Replies: 12)

Loading...