I Scaling a set in the plane

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This is a pretty simple question, I am just trying to clear up confusion. Let ##D## be the rectangle in the plane with vertices ##(-1,0),(-1,1),(1,1),(1,0)##. Let ##\lambda >0##. Then what exactly does the set ##\lambda D## look like? Is it correct to say that, for example, ##2D## is the rectangle with vertices ##(-2,0),(-2,2),(2,2),(2,0)##?
 
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This is a pretty simple question, I am just trying to clear up confusion. Let ##D## be the rectangle in the plane with vertices ##(-1,0),(-1,1),(1,1),(1,0)##. Let ##\lambda >0##. Then what exactly does the set ##\lambda D## look like? Is it correct to say that, for example, ##2D## is the rectangle with vertices ##(-2,0),(-2,2),(2,2),(2,0)##?
Your interpretation seems reasonable to me, although I've never run into any other situations where a set was multiplied by a number.
 

Math_QED

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Your interpretation seems reasonable to me, although I've never run into any other situations where a set was multiplied by a number.
The concept of cosets in group theory is the first thing that comes to mind.
 

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