Sci-Fi Science

  • #51
Ivan Seeking
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Telos said:
Well, being inspired and being educated are complementary but very different things. I really want a show to do both.

I know the scientist you're talking about. He worked on the Deep Space 1 probe, and he uses that quote from Star Trek to introduce the probe's ion drive. Spock said something like, "Captain, unknown alien ship ahead, detecting ion drive... very advanced technology." It's an amusingly ironic anecdote, because here we have an actual ion drive, and it's not at all like Star Trek, but it's still really cool.
Yes, he mentioned that in the interview that I saw. I forget what year ST1 was supposed to be taking place...2650 or something? And the aliens were waaaaaaaayyyy ahead of us; "aye, Captain, they could teach us a thing or two".

I just want to see some sci-fi that is more down to this universe. :frown:

How many shows have to come and go before one actually gets serious about language barriers? What's so fun about watching a fake super-genius learn a language in a couple minutes? :grumpy: Are people turned off by the nitty gritty? I don't think so. There are ways to make it fun, interesting, and genuinely educational.

It'd probably have to be an entirely new genre.

Social science fiction. :rofl:
I see good Sci-Fi, even TV and movies, as a gateway drug to real science. Also, at least for me, the inspirational part of Sci-Fi comes from what might be possible, not just what is or will be possible. Even so, I completely understand what you mean. I have always gravitated towards the most plausible Sci-Fi, and make fun of the silliness in all of the bad stuff I now watch. Tsu [my wife] hates it when I pick thing apart. :biggrin: But I love the stuff so much that I even watched A Boy and His Dog!

Anyway, a fifth time viewing of a bad Star Trek re-run is still better than the best episode of Friends. :biggrin: But it's pretty tough to even approach the level of a good SF novel with a movie or TV program. I think a good novel can do justice to the science of SF.
 
  • #52
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Danger said:
Since only 2 of you answered, (and 1 cheated :tongue: ) I'll declare you winners. I should have known better than to ask it here. No one, and I do mean absolutely no one outside of the SF/Science community acknowledges that Charly was science fiction. I bet you'll find it in the mainstream drama section of your local video place.
Danger said:
You're not allowed to Google during a game of 'Trivial Pursuit'.
I did guess. And then I got curious.

One day people will have microchips implanted in their heads and we will be able to google anytime we like. Images sent directly to the brain will teach children how to read and write. Grades K-12 installed and learned. Hmm, then again people would probably use it to record all their favorite game show and soap channels and watch them without having to open their eyes in the morning. They might never learn anything.
 
  • #53
Danger
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Janus said:
That despite the fact that Flowers for Algernon won Daniel Keyes both the Hugo in 1959 for the Short story and the Nebula in 1966 for the Novel.
I read the short story when I was about 14 and it just blew me away. When I tried to find it again, I ran into the novel. It was just as good, but different. Then the movie... I would have sworn that it was an unfilmable story, but they did an awesome job of it.

Ivan Seeking said:
I forget what year ST1 was supposed to be taking place...2650 or something?
I believe it was the 2200's.

Ivan Seeking said:
But I love the stuff so much that I even watched A Boy and His Dog!
Try the original short story by Harlan Ellison: "Blood Was a Rover".
 
  • #54
Janus
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Danger said:
I read the short story when I was about 14 and it just blew me away. When I tried to find it again, I ran into the novel. It was just as good, but different. Then the movie... I would have sworn that it was an unfilmable story, but they did an awesome job of it.


I believe it was the 2200's.


Try the original short story by Harlan Ellison: "Blood Was a Rover".
Danger, you seem to have a good grasp of the the SF genre, so I was wondering, what are your thoughts on Lime Jello?
 
  • #55
Danger
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Janus said:
Danger, you seem to have a good grasp of the the SF genre, so I was wondering, what are your thoughts on Lime Jello?
Good lubricant, but doesn't go well with fish.
Sorry, I don't get the reference. I've read quite a bit of SF, and consider myself a fan, but I'm not obsessive about it. I belonged to a club in Calgary about 20 years ago for quite a while, primarily because the conversations were much like here in GD. If you tell me where it's from, I might remember having read it. :smile:
 
  • #56
Janus
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Danger said:
Good lubricant, but doesn't go well with fish.
Sorry, I don't get the reference. I've read quite a bit of SF, and consider myself a fan, but I'm not obsessive about it. I belonged to a club in Calgary about 20 years ago for quite a while, primarily because the conversations were much like here in GD. If you tell me where it's from, I might remember having read it. :smile:
Its not a literary reference, it was just my round-about way of asking if you ever got into active Fandom (as in attending Sf conventions). Lime Jello is a reference to a legendary story of an event in Con history.
 
  • #57
Danger
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Janus said:
Its not a literary reference, it was just my round-about way of asking if you ever got into active Fandom (as in attending Sf conventions). Lime Jello is a reference to a legendary story of an event in Con history.
I was Security Chief for Non-Con 4, the first convention ever held in Calgary. It was my club that put it on. There were 2 or 3 more Non-Cons, which I worked Security for but didn't want Chiefdom again, then it became Con-Version. I don't even know 95% of the people in charge any more, and haven't attended one in over 10 years. I spent all my time in the con suite or the huckster's room anyhow, so I'm only missing some old friendships that were casual to start with. Sounds like you're a bit deeper into it. :smile:
 
  • #58
Janus
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Danger said:
I was Security Chief for Non-Con 4, the first convention ever held in Calgary. It was my club that put it on. There were 2 or 3 more Non-Cons, which I worked Security for but didn't want Chiefdom again, then it became Con-Version. I don't even know 95% of the people in charge any more, and haven't attended one in over 10 years. I spent all my time in the con suite or the huckster's room anyhow, so I'm only missing some old friendships that were casual to start with. Sounds like you're a bit deeper into it. :smile:
Not much any more. Its been a good 15 yrs since I've attended one. I attended quite a few Orycons (held here in Portland), and Norwescons (in Seattle). I made one Viking Con up in Bellingham WA. (Viking Con was thrown to raise money in order to keep the Viking Mars missions running.) I even made a Westercon the year it was held in Portland.

I actually met my wife at the first Norwescon I went to ( it was her first too). Other good memories from those times; Sitting in on a bull session with Poul Anderson in the Hospitality Suite at Viking Con. Creeping out the Mundanes as you walked into the elevator in full costume.:devil:

Once my daughter was born it became harder to get away for cons and we just sort of drifted away.
 
  • #59
Danger
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Janus said:
Not much any more. Its been a good 15 yrs since I've attended one. I attended quite a few Orycons (held here in Portland), and Norwescons (in Seattle). I made one Viking Con up in Bellingham WA. (Viking Con was thrown to raise money in order to keep the Viking Mars missions running.) I even made a Westercon the year it was held in Portland.
There's a pretty good chance that you might know a few of the people from my club (DEC). I'm not going to mention any names in a public forum, but I'll PM them to you. They used to make the trips to the western regional cons in Seattle, California, etc.. If you ever saw a mermaid riding on the back of a centaur in the costume contest, those were a couple of ours.
 

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