Science Non-fiction Book Reviews

  • #1
ISamson
Gold Member
440
162
Hello.

I am very keen on reading science non-fiction books on basically all science topics especially physics, chemistry, technology and neuroscience. I would like to dedicate this thread to some suggestions of particularly enjoyed non-fiction books with some very short reviews and opinions.
I value any contributions.
Thank you.

IS.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ISamson
Gold Member
440
162
I have recently read some amazing books:
Michio Kaku - The Future of the Mind

Professor of theoretical physics talks about the advances of technology and how this will affect future research of the neurological system and the mind. Mental illnesses, telekinesis, consciousness, AI and more.

The book discusses various possibilities of advanced technology that can alter the brain and mind. Looking into things such as telepathy, telekinesis, consciousness, artificial intelligence, and transhumanism, the book covers a wide range of topics. In it, Kaku proposes a "spacetime theory of consciousness". Similarly to Ray Kurzweil, he believes the advances in silicon computing will serve our needs as opposed to producing a generation of robot overlords.

Ian Stewart - Calculating the Cosmos, How Mathematics Unveils the Universe

Professor of mathematics explains some astronomical and cosmological concepts and what a huge role of discovering them mathematics has played and continues playing on scientific breakthroughs and discoveries.

Stephen Hawking - A Brief History of Time

Professor Hawking takes us through the most innovative recent discoveries and advances of physics in the last century or so. From black holes to String theory.


I also have another book by Michio Kaku (which I have not yet started reading) entitled "Parallel Worlds".
The book has twelve chapters arranged in three parts. Part I (Chapters 1-4) covers the Big Bang, the early development of the Universe, and how these topics relate to the Eternal Inflation Multiverse (Level II in the Tegmark hierarchy of Multiverses). Part II (Chapters 5-9) covers M-Theory and the Everett interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (Level III Multiverse). It also discusses how future technology will enable the creation of wormholes. Part III discusses the Big Freeze and how a Hyperspace wormhole (one in 11-dimensional Hyperspace rather than 3-dimensional normal space) will enable civilization and life to escape to a younger Universe.

In Parallel Worlds, Kaku presents many of the leading theories in physics; from Newtonian physics to Relativity to Quantum Physics to String theory and even into the newest version of string theory, called M-theory. He makes available to the reader a comprehensive description of many of the more compelling theories in physics, including many interesting predictions each theory makes, what physicists, astronomers, and cosmologists are looking for now and what technology they are using in their search.
 
  • #3
Amrator
246
83
The First Three Minutes by Steven Weinberg
The Particle at the End of the Universe by Sean Carroll
The Cold Wars: A History of Superconductivity by Jean Matricon

Those are the three pop science books that got me to pursue physics.

The Brain: The Story of You by David Eagleman

David Eagleman is the Carl Sagan of neuroscience.
 

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