Scientists want more money

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  • #1
wolram
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http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/34137

In the letter, the laureates complain that "hundreds of scientists have been laid off; research grants have been slashed; and facilities operations have been seriously curtailed at national laboratories", as a result of the shortfall. They also warn that the damage done to American science in 2008 "will become permanent if it is not rectified within the next few months". This damage, they say, could hamper the nation’s ability to respond to "increased global competition from countries such as China, India, and South Korea".
 

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  • #2
Moonbear
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It's not just in physics. In the life sciences, we're struggling for funding too. I'm already looking for non-research positions because I'm fed up with it (when people with more experience and better track records and more established labs than me can't get funding, I don't have much hope for my own career in the short term...grants that would have been funded a few years ago are well below the funding lines now, and friends of mine who are on study sections reviewing grants say the atmosphere is almost funereal when they have to turn down great research because there just isn't enough money). Even some of the tenured faculty are getting tired of insufficient funding to do anything productive, so are looking to get out of research as well (or at least research in academic institutions dependent on public funding).
 
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http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/34137

In the letter, the laureates complain that "hundreds of scientists have been laid off; research grants have been slashed; and facilities operations have been seriously curtailed at national laboratories", as a result of the shortfall. They also warn that the damage done to American science in 2008 "will become permanent if it is not rectified within the next few months". This damage, they say, could hamper the nation’s ability to respond to "increased global competition from countries such as China, India, and South Korea".
Permanent damages have already occured I can tell you. I know of several brillant physicists who have already left. Some of them young not getting permanent position, some of them senior deserving better than what can be offered right now here.

The only reason I have not left is because the machine is here. If we could take the hardware with us, we would already all have left.

Hopefully next year will be more reasonable.

My two cents :smile:
 
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wolram
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How much is 500 Mill to a country like America? i bet they loose that much every year on military projects.
 
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Moonbear
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How much is 500 Mill to a country like America? i bet they loose that much every year on military projects.
That's the problem, all of the money that usually goes into research is being spent in Iraq.
 
  • #6
Scientists want more money

Everybody wants more money. That's the beauty of inflation. :smile:
 
  • #7
wolram
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Scientists want more money

Everybody wants more money. That's the beauty of inflation. :smile:
I think this is a more serious issue, good brains are going to waste, the brains of people who have spent a life time learning and gaining qualifications, countries need these people to lead
the way in science.
It is unfortunate that overseas problems are robbing the country of future scientific gains.
 
  • #8
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The number of people studying math oriented fields (science, engineering) in the US is half of what it was in the nineties. This has nothing to do with our education system (which in spite of what the media says is generally excellent) or with Americans being stupid or lazy. It has everything to do with return on investment. People put time and money into getting educated. Why would they want to invest into a field that is declining? Yes, there is a discount for the fields being interesting.... but that does not make up for not having a stable job.
 
  • #9
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The 'war' in Iraq is part of the problem--the other part is that Bush doesn't believe in science or the scientific process


He once said, "My brain hurt when I tried to think about such stuff--so I don't anymore."
 
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Tom Mattson
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the other part is that Bush doesn't believe in science or the scientific process
That's just what I was going to say. We've got a monkey in the White House who gits his answers from a Higher Power. And he don't need no fizzicks or biolojee to tell him no differnt from what he already knows to be 'true'.
 
  • #11
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That's just what I was going to say. We've got a monkey in the White House who gits his answers from a Higher Power. And he don't need no fizzicks or biolojee to tell him no differnt from what he already knows to be 'true'.
you just gave me an idea--


we should all chip in to buy him a "The Pet Goat" reading level of the Bible when he retires
 
  • #12
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This is very sad. Energy research is arguably one of the most important areas of research for the future...

Of course, the POTUS, being invested in the current source of E, might not care too much... but I digress. I speak more like a conspiracy theorist when I say things like this.
 

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