Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Homework Help: Second order ODE

  1. Feb 11, 2010 #1
    Find k:

    [tex]20\frac{d^2x}{dt^2} + \frac{dx}{dt} + kx = 0[/tex]

    when t = 0
    - x = 1
    - dx/dt = 1

    My attempt at this in maxima:

    Code (Text):
    (%i1) 20*'diff( 'diff(x, t), t) + 'diff(x, t) + k*x = 0;
                                     2
                                    d x   dx
    (%o1)                        20 --- + -- + k x = 0
                                      2   dt
                                    dt
    (%i2) ode2(%, x, t);
    Is  80 k - 1  positive, negative, or zero?

    positive;
                                     k    1                     k    1
                                sqrt(- - ---) t            sqrt(- - ---) t
                - t/40               5   400                    5   400
    (%o2) x = %e       (%k1 sin(---------------) + %k2 cos(---------------))
                                       2                          2
    (%i3) ic2(%, x=1, t=0, 'diff(x,t) = 1);
                                 k    1
                            sqrt(- - ---) t
                - t/40           5   400
    (%o3) x = %e       (cos(---------------)
                                   2
                 k    1                                 k    1
            sqrt(- - ---) t                        sqrt(- - ---) t
                 5   400              k    1            5   400
     - (sin(---------------) (20 sqrt(- - ---) sin(---------------)
                   2                  5   400             2
                k    1                              k    1
           sqrt(- - ---) t                     sqrt(- - ---) t
                5   400            t/40             5   400
     + cos(---------------) + 40 %e    ))/(sin(---------------)
                  2                                   2
                                 k    1
                            sqrt(- - ---) t
               k    1            5   400
     - 20 sqrt(- - ---) cos(---------------)))
               5   400             2
    (%i4) solve(%, k);
               sqrt(80 k - 1) t              t/20  2
    (%o4) [sin(----------------) = - (sqrt(%e     x
                      40
                      t/40     sqrt(80 k - 1) t         t/20
     + ((320 k - 4) %e     cos(----------------) + 80 %e    ) x
                                      40
                      2 sqrt(80 k - 1) t           t/20      t/40          t/40
     + (4 - 320 k) cos (----------------) + 1600 %e    ) + %e     x + 40 %e    )
                               40
                             sqrt(80 k - 1) t
    /(2 sqrt(80 k - 1)), sin(----------------) =
                                    40
            t/20  2                  t/40     sqrt(80 k - 1) t         t/20
    (sqrt(%e     x  + ((320 k - 4) %e     cos(----------------) + 80 %e    ) x
                                                     40
                      2 sqrt(80 k - 1) t           t/20      t/40          t/40
     + (4 - 320 k) cos (----------------) + 1600 %e    ) - %e     x - 40 %e    )
                               40
    /(2 sqrt(80 k - 1))]
    What am I doing wrong or what am I not doing? Help is very appreciated.

    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 11, 2010 #2
    Is this a homework question? From my initial attempt, I am getting two equations with three unknowns.

    20x'' + x' + kx = 0. Try x(t) = ert, then 20r2ert + rert + kert = 0 and 20r2 + r + k = 0.

    [tex]r_{1,2}=\frac{-1 \pm \sqrt{1 - 4(20)k}}{40}[/tex]

    If the discriminant is nonzero then

    [tex]x(t) = c_1e^{r_1t} + c_2e^{r_2t}[/tex]

    [tex]x'(t) = c_1r_1e^{r_1t} + c_2r_2e^{r_2t[/tex]

    x(0) = 1 implies 1 = c1 + c2
    x'(0) = 1 implies 1 = c1r1 + c2r2

    It seems to me that there needs to be another constraint in order to solve for c1, c2 and k. Perhaps I am overlooking something, but I will keep trying.
     
Share this great discussion with others via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook