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Seeing in 3d

  1. Oct 25, 2014 #1
    So for the longest time now i have always avoided trying to picture things in 3D or anything related to 3D whether it is maths, physics, chem etc. But recently i have been really attracted to physics and math and well i decided to just start studying both these subject whenever i have free time, however i find that a lot of the physics and math involve 3D aspects and so if i want to be really proficient in it or really good at it i must not try to avoid this particular area of those science so my question is is there any way, any daily exercise i can do in order to be able to be really comfortable with the 3D aspect. For example, i know that being able to visualize things in 3d helps in calculus such as solid or revolution or initially when u learn partial derivative in order to have an intuition of what you are essentially doing. So i would like to be able to MASTER this 3d aspect so i can have a better understating of physics, math, organic chem ( visualizing molecules in chem is very important as well ). So please give me tips, exercise, ideas anything that can help me achieve this objective.


    thank you
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 25, 2014 #2

    russ_watters

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    I'm not clear on what exactly you need help with.
     
  4. Oct 25, 2014 #3
    Hi, russ_watters i would just like to know if there is anything i can do in order to improve my ability to see things in 3d in my head.
     
  5. Oct 25, 2014 #4

    Danger

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    The only thing that comes to mind is to occasionally take time out to closely study your surroundings. Pay attention to how things interact with each other in your visual field, especially when you move around and their relative positions shift. Also, make sure when trying to envision something that you do so with the same parallax (distance between eyes) that you have in real life. That's automatic for me, but it just occurred to me that maybe it isn't for other people.
     
  6. Oct 25, 2014 #5
    thank for the advice but i need something more concrete also i don't believe that some things aren't or are for people. if your work hard enough everything is possible so i just have to work hard to achieve my results but thats beside the point.
     
  7. Oct 25, 2014 #6

    symbolipoint

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    The actual course instruction should include techniques for drawing graphs of three-dimensional situations. If you studied "Euclidian Geometry" in your community college or your high school, then some three-D drawing techniques were also included -- all this means, using the two-D paper or chalkboard to represent three-D object or situation.

    You can also learn to handle three-dimensional representations through study perspective drawing.
     
  8. Oct 25, 2014 #7
    Amazing
     
  9. Oct 25, 2014 #8
    Agreed!
     
  10. Oct 25, 2014 #9

    symbolipoint

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    yoooosam may very well mean just what he said. A few people really do have great difficulty thinking in 3d. They can not easily make sense of figures representing structures representing three dimensions shown in some textbooks on the two-dimensional page.
     
  11. Oct 25, 2014 #10
    (I don't know if it's of any help, but I post it anyway)

    Here are some online adjustable 3D visualizers (from http://vectorvisualizer.codeplex.com/):

    Vector visualizer: http://www.bodurov.com/VectorVisualizer/
    (at the bottom of the page there are various predefined shapes like Cube, Pyramid , 4D cube projection on 3D, Tetrahedron, Dodecahedron)

    Nearest Stars in 3D: http://www.bodurov.com/NearestStars/

    Color Map Visualizer in 3D: http://www.bodurov.com/ColorMapVisualizer/
    (seems a little buggy to me, and I don't know what it's good for actually, but anyway...)

    There are also loads of various software that runs in 3D, but I can't say I have any particular recommendation at the moment, maybe someone else have...?
     
  12. Oct 25, 2014 #11

    Danger

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    Strangely enough, I have that same problem trying to envision 4D structures represented by 3D models, but I just attributed that to my brain existing in only 3 dimensions. (Discounting time as the true 4th dimension, because I can sort of get a handle on that one.)
     
  13. Oct 25, 2014 #12

    symbolipoint

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    I wan NOT joking, and neither were those people I had met who had this 2d-to-3d difficulty.
     
  14. Oct 25, 2014 #13

    Danger

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    I never suggested that you were, and I wasn't kidding about the 4D thing. No matter how much I've read about hypercubes or seen 3D representations of them, I simply cannot envision one in all 4 dimensions. It's frustrating, not funny.
     
  15. Oct 25, 2014 #14

    symbolipoint

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    Don't worry about it. Just take the meaning exactly how it was posted. We both did.
     
  16. Oct 25, 2014 #15

    DaveC426913

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    You might consider taking up sketching. Still life, or anything like that. This will give your brain and eyes practice in 3D visualization.
     
  17. Oct 25, 2014 #16
    What's amazing is that he said he had always avoided trying to do it, almost as if it were bad for you like alcohol or McDonald's food. It seems no wonder he can't do it now, having squelched the ability for years.
     
  18. Oct 26, 2014 #17

    symbolipoint

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    Could be either one or the other. Some things one learns through try and practice. Some things don't become learned through try and practice because improvement just does not happen. Natural talents vary among people. Second semester Calculus used three-dimensional drawings on a flat surface to help show information about integrals for finding volumes. Learning to make most of the drawings was not very difficult - struggling through the semester's lessons was still not so easy.
     
  19. Oct 26, 2014 #18

    symbolipoint

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    This makes one think that some people have more trouble learning to handle a pen or pencil than others. Learning to think of technical things in 3-d puts together site, drawing, and the mental judgement between the two.
     
  20. Oct 26, 2014 #19
    It seems that ur post did not contribute anything so please if u don't have nothing to say don't say anything. For all i know u could be the dumbest person in this forum don't make me sound like an idiot. i already did calculus 1 and 2, linear algebra , organic chemistry so its not like i never did any 3d related stuff i just wanted to know i there is anyway to master it. For example, Finding if the mirror image of some certain cyclic compound are enantiomers or no require rotation of these molecules in 3d which is sometimes pretty hard. So please if you have nothing to say like i said don't say anything at all
     
  21. Oct 26, 2014 #20
    thank you everyone for the replies but i didn't really get what i was searching for but still thx anyways.
     
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