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Self-studying QM?

  1. Nov 30, 2015 #1
    Whole my life I have been interested in Quantum Physics. I have a bachelor degree in IT. I did not finish my studies.

    I have always been quite sloppy in studying in school. As a result, my mathematics skills are terrible.

    I often get pointed out on this forum that I better start with the basics of QM. I got the advice to read a book of D.J. Griffiths: "Introduction to Quantum Mechanics".

    My question: given my very poor math skills, does it make sense to self-study quantum mechanics?
     
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  3. Nov 30, 2015 #2

    Vanadium 50

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    Books at that level assume a fluent understanding of calculus, and some familiarity with differential equations and linear algebra. If you have that much, you should be OK. If you don't, you will have difficulties.
     
  4. Nov 30, 2015 #3
    I have had that all in my studies, but have thrown the syllabuses way. Does it make sense to self-study all those things (which I should be able to catch up again fairly quickly) without a tutor?
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2015
  5. Nov 30, 2015 #4

    micromass

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    Yes, that would make most sense.
     
  6. Nov 30, 2015 #5
    Okay. So does anyone have good advice as to what books I better start with?
     
  7. Nov 30, 2015 #6

    micromass

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  8. Nov 30, 2015 #7
    Thanks! Any good book on linear algebra??
     
  9. Nov 30, 2015 #8

    ZapperZ

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    Since your intention here is not to study math, but rather study enough to understand and use it in your self-study QM effort, why not use a mathematical physics text? I've recommended Mary Boas's text many times, which had been written so that you may use it as a self-study book with only a sophomore level mathematics background.

    Do a search on here for Mary Boas "Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences".

    Zz.
     
  10. Nov 30, 2015 #9
    I'm planning on buying the book of Mary Boas. I want to practice the problems too. But is there a book with the answers to the problems? (So that I can check if I solved them correctly)
     
  11. Nov 30, 2015 #10

    ZapperZ

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    Please note that there is a Students Solution Manual to Mary Boas's book. She included answers and some even full worked out problems that came from the book.

    Zz.
     
  12. Nov 30, 2015 #11
    MATHEMATICAL METHODS FOR PHYSICISTS A Comprehensive Guide SEVENTH EDITION George B. Arfken, Hans J. Weber, Frank E. Harris
     
  13. Nov 30, 2015 #12

    ZapperZ

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    Arfken is a bit more advanced than Boas. While Boas is meant for students who had just completed all of their basic calculus courses, Arfken requires that you have a bit more knowledge of vector calculus etc. and as far as self study goes, Boas does a lot more verbal explanation than Arfken, especially in her solution manual.

    I've used both extensively, so I'm intimately aware of both texts.

    Zz.
     
  14. Nov 30, 2015 #13
    I'm not sure if either of them are available in my country and I don't have a credit card :frown:
     
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