Self-Taught Physics: Recommendations for Intermediate Classical Physics

  • Thread starter Bayou Tiger
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Physics
In summary, a person is seeking recommendations for self-taught physics books or materials focused on classical physics at an intermediate level. Some suggestions include Goldstein's Classical Mechanics, Mechanics by Landau & Lif****z, and various books on specific topics such as thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, electrodynamics, quantum mechanics, and relativity. It is also suggested to forget about enrolling in a university physics course and instead learn through self-teaching.
  • #1
Bayou Tiger
19
0
Hey, everyone. I just found this board tonight, and I would definitely appreciate some insight on physics reference and learning materials.

Can anybody recommend a good self-taught book (or set of books) for physics? Recently I renewed an interest in physics (as kind of a hobby), and I am looking for something more rigorous than an introductory college text. For now, I would like to focus strictly on classical physics to review, reinforce, and fill in some of the gaps at an intermediate level. Hopefully there is something available with a good blend of conceptual and mathematical. Any ideas?

Backgroud
- Full-time engineer
- BS in Eng, currently working on MS
- Intro physics, circuits, materials, statics, dynamics in college (math up to partial differentials with some vector calc)
- Intuitive thinker but like to calibrate intuition with equations

Thanks in advance!
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Goldstein's Classical Mechanics and/or Mechanics by Landau & Lif****z
 
  • #3
Check out the Harvard intermediate classical mechanics class:

Current:

http://www.courses.fas.harvard.edu/~phys151/

A different year:

http://huhepl.harvard.edu/~masahiro/phys151/
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #4
Mechanics: Goldstein Classical Mechanics (2nd edition or less), then Lanczos' Variational Principles.

Thermodynamics: Zemansky Thermodynamics (4th ed) and Howard Reiss' Methods of Thermodynamics

Statistical mechanics: Hill's introductory book

Electrodynamics: Arthur Kip's electricity and magnetism.

Quantum Mechanics: Resnick and Eisberg's Quantum mechanics of molecules, particles, etc.

Relativity: Hartle's relativity


After this intermediate stage, move on to the Landau's series.
 
  • #5
Also, forget about enrolling in a physics course in the university.
Great minds learn best by self-teaching.

Universities serve little purpose beyond granting degrees and PhDs.
 
  • #6
Dude, the post preceding yours in this thread was more than six years ago!
 

Related to Self-Taught Physics: Recommendations for Intermediate Classical Physics

1. What is "Self-Taught Physics"?

Self-Taught Physics is a method of learning physics independently, without the guidance of a formal teacher or course. It involves using textbooks, online resources, and personal experimentation to gain a deep understanding of the subject.

2. Who is the target audience for "Self-Taught Physics"?

The target audience for "Self-Taught Physics" is individuals who have a basic understanding of classical physics concepts and wish to further their knowledge on an intermediate level. This could include high school or undergraduate students, as well as anyone with a general interest in physics.

3. What are the recommended resources for "Self-Taught Physics"?

Some recommended resources for "Self-Taught Physics" include popular textbooks such as "University Physics" by Young and Freedman, online lectures and courses from reputable institutions like MIT OpenCourseWare, and physics forums and communities for discussion and clarification.

4. How can one ensure the effectiveness of self-taught learning in physics?

Effective self-taught learning in physics requires discipline, dedication, and a strong foundation in basic concepts. It is also important to regularly test and challenge your understanding through practice problems and experiments. Seeking guidance and feedback from experienced individuals or online communities can also greatly enhance the effectiveness of self-taught learning.

5. What are the benefits of "Self-Taught Physics"?

Some potential benefits of self-taught learning in physics include the ability to learn at your own pace and in your own preferred style, the development of critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and a deeper understanding and appreciation of the subject. It can also be a cost-effective alternative to formal education and can demonstrate self-motivation and determination to potential employers or academic institutions.

Similar threads

Replies
5
Views
723
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
725
Replies
8
Views
391
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
366
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
49
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top