1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Seperating metals in a solution

  1. Jun 14, 2005 #1
    A solution is found to have varying quantities of silver, barium and iron (III) ions.

    Suggest a procedure for seperating the ions by precipitation.


    Ok ...silver is +1, barium is +2, and iron (III) is +3.... so I would have to add anions of the same value (but negative) to the solution in order to form precipitates.

    so for example i could add OH^- and it would form a precipitate with the silver.

    I could add CO3^2- and it would form a precipitate with the barium.

    And I could add PO4^3- and it would form a precipitate with the iron (III) ions.

    This procedure would seperate all the metal ions.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------


    This is right............ right? :smile:
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 14, 2005 #2
    anyone?

    I'm pretty sure I'm rigght.. but just want to make sure.

    thanks
     
  4. Jun 14, 2005 #3
    Think in terms of solubility products, not oxidation states.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Seperating metals in a solution
  1. Seperation Vector (Replies: 3)

  2. Double Slit Seperation (Replies: 3)

  3. Seperate CO2 (Replies: 2)

Loading...