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Seriously mad

  1. Feb 18, 2005 #1
    I have not gone to my math class in 3 weeks. Just got out of the midterm, professor handed out answer sheets. I passed with flying colors. This should not be possible. Between this midterm and the last one i have not gone to class once, and i spent about an hour reviewing last night. Really really irked right now about this.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 18, 2005 #2

    DaveC426913

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    Can you give us a little more context? Maybe you're just brilliant?
     
  4. Feb 18, 2005 #3

    Its 3rd quarter calculus (the last third of first year calc), same book i used last year in high school (my math teacher actually picked it cause her kids go to this uni and it is a good book), although one of the chapters we didn't cover last year.

    Largely i'm annoyed at how the school awards credit for IB tests, because this is the second math class in a row that is a complete repeat for me. This one just happens to not collect homework, so i never have a reason to go to class.

    As much as i like to think i'm brilliant, i'm not brilliant enough to absorb 3 new chapters of amterial in an hour and pass.
     
  5. Feb 18, 2005 #4

    Moonbear

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    Okay, two things that I don't understand. 1) You said it's first year calc, but then refer to it being the second math class in a row that is a repeat for you...what math class would you take before first-year calc in college?
    2) If you already covered the material in high school, then that explains why you don't need to study in college (and very good that you've been able to retain the information after high school). But, were you not given any option to place out of first year calc if you've already covered it in high school? When I was in college (yeah, franz, back in the dark ages, I know), I placed out of several of my first year classes based on my AP exam scores, and placed into advanced levels of several other classes (they didn't call anything "honors" courses, but that's essentially what they were) based on my college placement test scores. This was great because it got me out of those huge freshman lectures and into smaller classes where the profs actually knew who we were.

    I'm also a bit curious why first year calc is stretched out over 3 quarters. Though the whole quarter system still boggles me (we have a quarter system where I am now and I'm not overly fond of the way it breaks up the academic year). In a semester system, Calc I is one semester, and Calc II is your second semester, Multivariable is semester I of your sophomore year and Diff Eqs 2nd semester sophomore year (if you needed it for your major), then you go off and take all your advanced courses. Is your first year Calc I and II combined, or do you really only cover Calc I over the course of the entire first year? My experience was that Calc II also overlapped a bit with high school calc, but apparently only because I had a really good high school. There was no overlap for most others in the class. But, that was okay, because it gave me about a half semester of review to refresh my memory before getting to the new material.
     
  6. Feb 18, 2005 #5
    I think you have come across one of the problems with our educational system: in many cases, courses are not geared toward the best in the class, but allowing the mediocre to survive. That is why I always found school so darn boring. Let's go over the obvious until even the morons get it.

    You are apparently above that level without working for it.

    Was there a curve?
     
  7. Feb 18, 2005 #6
    They let me skip 1st quarter calc (Calc I). Calc II was integral calc, that was the other reapeat. Calc 3 is vectors(in 3-d), parametrics, and sequences. Calc 4 is partial derivatives, multiple integrals and vector calc. (none of which will really be new material either, though i've never had it covered in a course).

    I did IB (although i did take AP calc as well as IB math HL, but the IB math HL covered far more, it included AP Calc, and another year of material).




    Calc I-III is the normal first year calc. 3 quarters per school year (plus one summer quarter). Calc IV is multi-variable, Then come differential equations, that 5 quarters, a little less than two years.

    Everything from the whole first year, Calc I-III is review for me. Like i said, we used the same book in my high school.
     
  8. Feb 18, 2005 #7

    Monique

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    So, you used the same chapters as last year, except one, and you wonder why you passed without studying? So.. did you think the questions were too simple or do you think you simply mastered the material? And, if you pass with flying colors, does that mean that you had all questions correct, or does that mean that you scored higher than the rest of the class?
     
  9. Feb 18, 2005 #8

    No, i don't wonder why i passed, i know why i passed. I'm angry that i'm being forced to waste my time retaking the same material.

    I don't know what the rest of the class got.

    I missed one question.
     
  10. Feb 18, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    But apparently you're not wasting your time retaking the material, you admitted yourself, you've been skipping class and not spending any time on it at all. If there was mandatory attendance, then you might complain you're wasting your time, but even then, sit in the back and do your homework for another class if you don't need to listen but are required to attend.

    Missed one question...out of how many? There's a big difference between 1 out of 6 questions and 1 out of 300 questions.
     
  11. Feb 18, 2005 #10
    No, i'm wasting a quarter on this calss when i could be taking the next one in the sequence instead.

    One out of ten. In a class where the curve usually adds 10 to 15% percent though.
     
  12. Feb 18, 2005 #11

    Monique

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    That'd be annoying. Did you talk to anyone before starting the class, about getting an exemption?

    Remember: you're responsible for your own life, don't wait for others to do stuff for you. If you keep that in the back of your mind, you'll be able to get stuff done more efficiently.
     
  13. Feb 18, 2005 #12
    I tried, but i since i was not 100% confident i would pass if i tried to test out, they wouldn't let me (i expected there to be more new material than there was).

    At least this is the last quarter i'll be doing this though.
     
  14. Feb 18, 2005 #13

    Monique

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    Good, I know it can be very demotivating if you don't get challenged. Be critical of things that are handed to you, get to the bottom to make sure things go as would be best.
     
  15. Feb 18, 2005 #14

    Moonbear

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    Well, the bright side of it is that it's an easy boost to your GPA if you're going to ace 3 quarters of coursework without even trying, and that gives you time to focus on studying harder for your other classes that are not as repetitive, or gives you more time to enjoy partying and being social a little longer before you have to buckle down and give up the fun in order to keep up with the more challenging coursework.
     
  16. Feb 18, 2005 #15

    Monique

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    Just curious, do you get an ace even when you don't answer all questions correctly?
     
  17. Feb 18, 2005 #16

    Depends on the curve. Like i said the curve is usually about 10-15%, and i missed 1 question out of ten. Technically, its not a perfect score, but i'm not a perfectionist. Well, at least not in these matters.
     
  18. Feb 18, 2005 #17

    Monique

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    What does that mean, when the curve is 10-15%?
     
  19. Feb 18, 2005 #18
    if the curve is 10%, then all the scores get 10% added to them basically. So a 90% becomes a hundred, 80 a 90, 70 an 80, and so one.
     
  20. Feb 18, 2005 #19

    Monique

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    So, the highest score will always be an A?
     
  21. Feb 18, 2005 #20
    Yeah, thats the idea. The highest score becomes 100%, and everything is scaled off of that.
     
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