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Sexual Harassment

  1. Aug 1, 2004 #1
    Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.
    Unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature constitutes sexual harassment when submission to or rejection of this conduct explicitly or implicitly affects an individual's employment, unreasonably interferes with an individual's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive work environment. Source: http://www.eeoc.gov/facts/fs-sex.html

    For the first time in his 25 years of employment, a female employee has made a verbal allegation of sexual harassment against a male friend of mine. "John" was notified of this by his immediate supervisor via an email. The email did not indicate an incident or complaint but rather was framed in the context of "feedback" advising John to be carefull when it comes to dealing with female employees. It went on to say that comments, compliments, innuendos, flirting, wandering eyes, etc. can be misperceived and possibly jeapordize his job. Needless to say, John was absolutely astounded. He immediately approached his supervisor and demanded clarification. The supervisor indicated that a female employee had verbalized the allegation. He then clarified his position on the matter by stating that he has never witnessed any such behavior by John nor believes any incident occurred. What bothers John however, is why was the email sent in the first place? Does it constitute some form of written warning? The employee handbook states that standard operating procedure requires a verbal warning first and then written warning followed by a final written warning and then termination. Were John's civil rights violated?

    The work environment today in the United States is becoming more and more polarized. Women are flagrantly disregarding company dress codes in order to flaunt there sexuality. It was interesting to discover how narrowly defined sexual harassment has become. A clause in the code mentions "visual harassment"; defined as any display that promotes the sexuality of what is depicted, or draws attention to the private parts of the body, even if there is partial clothing. Consequently, men are flagrantly disregarding verbal and visual inhibitions as they react to the sexual stimulus. The question that remains however, is which side constitutes criminality? Is it the sexual provocation or is it the sexual reaction? Do wandering male eyes encourage women to dress more provocatively or does female attire encourage wandering male eyes? Does a loose verbal atmosphere in the work place exacerbate the problem? Would clamping down constitute a violation of freedom of speech? What about the constant bombardment of sexual messages facilitated through various media? The 1960's ushered in the sexual revolution. Perhaps it is time for the counter revolution.
     
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  3. Aug 1, 2004 #2

    Kerrie

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    Where are your facts to back this up? This comment seems derived from your biased perspective because of these allegations. Even if women are dressing more provactively, are men not responsible for their actions when they make a comment or any other advance in response to a women's attire? I have worked at several different places, and each place of employment had dress codes. A woman dressing in a low cut shirt or short skirt at work is typically trying to draw attention to herself-especially if she is challenging an established dress code. Men can follow their biological urges and respond to her desire to attract their attention, or they can use some of their intelligence and ignore her attempt. The latter of the two makes neither a "victim" and sexual harrassment is never an issue.
     
  4. Aug 1, 2004 #3

    loseyourname

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    You just said exactly what he said:

     
  5. Aug 1, 2004 #4

    loseyourname

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    Look, I have never experienced this problem and I have no idea how prevalent it is. But if any woman is intentionally dressing in a provacative manner, and then complaining when a guy flirts with her, that's pretty damn stupid.
     
  6. Aug 1, 2004 #5

    Kerrie

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    you said exactly what i just said...

    and you would be surprised at what certain types will do when it comes to expressing their sexuality in the workplace...
     
  7. Aug 1, 2004 #6
    A woman at work is pressuring me to have a relationship with her. If that were the other way around, she could accuse me of sexual harassment. And she would most likely win. So much for 'equality'.
     
  8. Aug 1, 2004 #7
    You should report her. By law, it works both ways.
     
  9. Aug 1, 2004 #8
    Sure it works both ways. However, the law favors the woman more than the man.
     
  10. Aug 1, 2004 #9
    The law, as it's written, doesn't favor anyone. If you choose not to report the problem nothing can be done about it--but that's your decision.
     
  11. Aug 1, 2004 #10

    Kerrie

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    i have to agree with elizabeth...not saying anything because men in general "believe" the law favors women will continue to fuel a problem only you believe is there...
     
  12. Aug 1, 2004 #11
    The Professional,

    If your coworker's attempts at securing a relationship with you BOTHER you, you have every right to report it in.

    I concur 100%. I don't want to sound like an existentialist, but everyone is faced with a choice but regardless of the choice, you should face up to the consequences.

    On a side note, this is why I'm glad to be a physics-math nerd. I'm too preoccupied with reading the latest scientific journal to bother with the neighboring girl in the suggestive clothes.
     
  13. Aug 1, 2004 #12

    Kerrie

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    welcome back sting :smile: regardless of what you are reading, it would seem you have plain ol' class...
     
  14. Aug 2, 2004 #13
    Thanks Kerrie. :smile:

    I overlooked a thread mentioning you recently got married. Congratulations!
     
  15. Aug 2, 2004 #14
    I'm just saying it like it is. That's just reality.

    Let's be honest here. Any woman who would dress provocatively at work is attracting unwanted and unneeded attention not to mention violating the company's dress code! And any guy that would respond inappropriately is of course AS GUILTY as the woman.

    I've seen this at work up to the point where the boss had to send a notice to all the women reminding them on the dress code policy.
     
  16. Aug 2, 2004 #15

    loseyourname

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    I think the point you are trying to make is that judicial precedent is in favor of the woman, not the law itself.
     
  17. Aug 2, 2004 #16
    Yes. Agreed
     
  18. Aug 2, 2004 #17
    this brings to mind a segment on the late show where they read quotes from Opra. in this particular episode, brad pit was a guest on and Opra said something in the lines of 'you know what’s hot? your body'. brad just laughed and played along but it was blatant sexual harassment. if it were a man who said the same thing to a women, it would be vulgar and not comic.

    if a woman thinks a man is thinking of something sexual by the amount of time he stairs at her eyes, she can report she is feeling threatened or uncomfortable because of what she thinks is sexual tension (justified or otherwise).

    a classmate of mine in high school was sexually harassed in school by a man who slapped the buttock and gave explicit detail of sexual actions involving rape during classes but when my classmate reported this to the teacher nothing came of it except "ill talk to him about it" the harassment continued for a few weeks before the classmate told their parents and the parents spoke with the teacher and the offender was moved to a different desk in the class and the harassment stopped. because the victim in this case was male, the problem is dealt with the least possible action. if the victim was female i have no doubt this situation would have played out Much differently

    "The question that remains however, is which side constitutes criminality? Is it the sexual provocation or is it the sexual reaction?"-JOEBIALEK

    According to the law both, but according to your friend's continued employment, sexual provocation has Nothing to do with it. also, the part about sexual reaction has more to do with the female employee's perception then your friends actions (your friend's employer is more likely to give another warning then probe deeper into the subject of his "wandering eyes")
     
  19. Aug 2, 2004 #18

    loseyourname

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    How can it honestly be a crime to look at someone the wrong way?
     
  20. Aug 2, 2004 #19

    Kerrie

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    agreed as well, but if men are only complaining about it and not doing anything about it, it will continue to be a problem...women no longer tolerated sexual harrassment, thus they stood up for themselves as well...i think though guys are afraid of looking like a wuss if they complain because it makes them look like they "can't handle" such a comment...women want equal rights, but we along with that comes equal responsibilities, so men, stand up for yourselves and be heard...
     
  21. Aug 3, 2004 #20
    It's called a double standard. As given on the example above,
    if a woman tells a man he's got a hot body it's all fine. The guy itself doesn't take that personally. For us guys, it's no big deal. We're not a wuss for not complaining. There's a minority of women that would take that comment negatively and they're usually old, humorless witches.
     
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2004
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