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She was a Geordie

  1. Jul 4, 2006 #1

    wolram

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    But after a stroke she woke up with a jamaican accent, doctors said she has a rare case of foreign accent syndrome. :surprised

    In 1999 an american woman Tiffany Roberts was left with a mix of cockney and west country burr after a stroke.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 4, 2006 #2
    When I have my stroke, I want to talk in Jive and Ebonics.
     
  4. Jul 4, 2006 #3
    Here is a link British Accent.

    A quote:

    There is a simple explanation for all this. Her speech was impared and people thought she spoke with a foreign acccent.

    Also the article states:
    Which is of course complete baloney, I do not believe a word about it.
    It may sound a bit like it but this is "National Enquirer" level of reporting.
    And that from the BBC News. :bugeye:
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2006
  5. Jul 4, 2006 #4

    Danger

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    You can giggle all you want, but I've heard of this syndrome before, going back at least a couple of decades. There's even been speculation that such was the basis for the old Jesus-freak types claiming that people spoke 'in tongues'. Supposedly, it's a weird form of Wernicke's aphasia. I'm afraid that I have no idea where to find the references. Given my educational background, it was probably in SciAm.
     
  6. Jul 4, 2006 #5

    Evo

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    MeJennifer is correct, they aren't actually speaking with any certain accent, their speech is affected and people "thinks it sounds like" such and such. After my dad's stroke he sounded like Mickey Mouse. It was horrible.

    We've discussed this in another thread. People aren't actually suddenly knowing and speaking in other accents, it's just what is perceived by the listener.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2006
  7. Jul 4, 2006 #6

    Danger

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    Was that what made you such a Disney fan? :confused:
     
  8. Jul 4, 2006 #7

    Math Is Hard

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    http://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/voice/aphasia.htm
    "You know that smoodle pinkered and that I want to get him round and take care of him like you want before"
    Okay, to me that sounds incredibly British-slangy. If Wol wrote that I wouldn't bat an eye. :biggrin:
     
  9. Jul 4, 2006 #8

    Evo

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    I was just going to say "that's Wolram"!!!! :biggrin:
     
  10. Jul 4, 2006 #9
    I can imagine that, seeing that happen to a person you know your whole life.
     
  11. Jul 5, 2006 #10

    wolram

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    Me geliefan mine feond astandan :tongue 2 :
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2006
  12. Jul 5, 2006 #11

    wolram

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    Hang on did i just say cobblers or rowlocks :confused:
     
  13. Jul 5, 2006 #12

    Math Is Hard

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    Oh, give it up, Wol! You're just trying to buy a ticket into our labs to be probed and prodded by hot, nubile UCLA grad students.
     
  14. Jul 5, 2006 #13

    wolram

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    Fight or flight, i am just so torn, sod it, i lay down my arms.:!!)
     
  15. Jul 5, 2006 #14

    Math Is Hard

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    Fine. I'll tell them to be gentle with you. :smile:
     
  16. Jul 7, 2006 #15

    Ouabache

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    Okay, i'll bite, what's a Geordie?

    First time i heard the term, was in a Mark Knopfler lyric in Sailing To Philadelphia

    I am Jeremiah Dixon, I am a Geordie boy..
    Does it have to do with a King George?

    There are other unique references in there too such as:

    This Baker's Boy From The West Country and
    A World Away From The Coaly Tyne

    though I have no idea what he is referencing..:confused:
     
  17. Jul 8, 2006 #16
    :rolleyes:
     
  18. Jul 8, 2006 #17
    Ever hear Ed Witten speak? He too sounds very much like Mickey Mouse. It's quite a mismatched voice for him, he's a rather tall and imposing figure. In his case it's his natural accent, I believe.

    Good thing these posts are anonymous...
     
  19. Jul 8, 2006 #18
    :rolleyes: to your :rolleyes:
     
  20. Jul 8, 2006 #19

    Kurdt

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    I be a geordie! Geordie is a term for people born in newcastle and comes from the George Stephenson mining safety lamp which was used extensively by people from Newcastle who were mainly coal miners in the 18th century.

    Here is the wiki entry.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geordie

    The original derivation of the term on the wiki page being related to King George is not a widely held view here in Newcastle. Anyway Geordie's are distinguishable by their dialect and I found an amusing page to convert english to geordie.

    http://www.geordie.org.uk/
     
  21. Jul 9, 2006 #20

    Ouabache

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    Very good Kurdt, you be a Geordie ay? Pleased to meet you!!
    Thanks for those references. I learned something new today. The Newcastle dialect appears quite interesting.

    Perhaps the lyric "A World Away From The Coaly Tyne" ties in with the same coal mining industry in the 1700s.
     
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