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Sherlock Holmes

  1. Jan 11, 2010 #1
    My wife informs me that next weekend I want to see the new Sherlock Holmes movie with her. She likes murder mysteries in general and she especially likes the Sherlock Holmes series with Jeremy Brett. I don't mind seeing all those dead bodies on the TV, but I wish she wouldn't take notes while she watches. I constantly remind her that all the schemes she sees ultimately fail. Has anyone here seen the new movie and care to tell me about it?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2010 #2
    LOL. I hate it when they make those decisions for us.

    I haven't seen it myself but a coworker of mine has seen it and he didn't like all of the action or the historical inaccuracies.

    Thanks
    Matt
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2010
  4. Jan 11, 2010 #3

    Matterwave

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    I had a problem with the times. It's supposedly set like 1880s-1890s but they mention a "weakened America due to the Civil War" which occured in the 1860's...But I still enjoyed the film overall.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2010 #4
    I won't watch it because I'm a huge Sherlock Holmes fan, and Sherlock Holmes stories are not action flicks with a bunch of explosions and chase scenes.
     
  6. Jan 11, 2010 #5

    mgb_phys

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    When horses run off the road on a corner do they burst into flames?
    Can Watson fire several hundred rounds from his 'trusty service revolver' before reloading?
    Does anyone drive a hansom can up a conveniently placed ramp and roll it before skidding in fornt of the bad guys?
     
  7. Jan 11, 2010 #6

    turbo

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    I know what you mean. My wife reads every murder mystery she can get her hands on, and must know about a thousand ways to get rid of somebody. :uhh:
     
  8. Jan 11, 2010 #7
    turbo-1

    I would get nervous if she starts taking notes. LOL

    Matt
     
  9. Jan 11, 2010 #8

    BobG

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    Alimony ends when the person paying dies. When you're paying alimony, your ex-wife suddenly starts thinking about ways to keep you alive.
     
  10. Jan 11, 2010 #9
    Aren't most countries weakened after a war? The Civil War was pretty costly. I wouldn't doubt some effects of the war lingering 20 years later.

    I haven't seen the film yet, but if you read it that way it is plausible.
     
  11. Jan 11, 2010 #10

    Matterwave

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    The Civil war ended in 1865, with reconstruction following shortly thereafter. I'm not 100% on this, but I think by the 1880's and 90's the recovery should have been mostly finished. I don't know if the US was still weakened in the 80's and 90's, I'm not really a history buff, but the way they were talkin about it in the movie made it sound like the civil war just ended.
     
  12. Jan 11, 2010 #11
    Does this help?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Economic_history_of_the_United_States" [Broken]
    It was called the Gilded Age.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherlock_Holmes" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  13. Jan 11, 2010 #12
    :rofl::biggrin::rofl: This is the movie I want to see!
     
  14. Jan 11, 2010 #13
    Could you please send me some of your latest American detective fiction. I desperately need this material because I am an Englishman studying late 20th century American history.
     
  15. Jan 11, 2010 #14

    BobG

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    But wouldn't our latest detective fiction be 21st century literature?
     
  16. Jan 11, 2010 #15
    Well, yes: today's books are of this century, while the 20th Century is history now.

    I was just trying to suggest that historical accuracy might not be uppermost in the minds of those who produce detective stories, particularly commercial films. It is better to get these things right, no doubt, and I can see that serious inaccuracy could spoil spoil the enjoyment for some. Perhaps though they sometimes take these things too seriously.
     
  17. Jan 11, 2010 #16

    DaveC426913

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    I think she's going to be terribly disappointed, if not annoyed. I think it's about 90% action and 10% Holmes.
     
  18. Jan 11, 2010 #17
    I wonder why there's no Sherlock Holmes series of movies, like Bond movies.
     
  19. Jan 11, 2010 #18

    DaveC426913

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    I think for the same reason that this erstwhile Sherlock Holmes movie actually had to be written to be as much like a Bond movie as possible - because action sells; brainiacism does not.
     
  20. Jan 11, 2010 #19
    There's at least one. Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce made a bunch of really lousy ones.
     
  21. Jan 11, 2010 #20

    mgb_phys

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    Gadgets - check (well Sebastian Moran's air rifle)
    Cliff hanger ending on waterfall - check
    Special effects - luminous dog
    Glamorous women - no, apart from Mrs. Hudson

    If you get the chance check out the Jeremy Brett UK-tv series.
    All the reasonably film-able stories are very faithfull, some of the others are stretched out to feature length but some of the small silly ones from the 'Return of' are missing.
     
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