Shoes and Friction

  • #26
BiGyElLoWhAt
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Well any input?
A couple things, actually.

1) what is this dual ranged force sensor that you have, and how does it work? also, what units are you working in? (just curious)
2) I agree with haruspex, how are you maintaining consistency while doing these experiments? It seems as though you're cooling, then moving to room temperature, then conducting your run to gather data. How do you think the results would compare if you were to do your "frigid" experiment in an environment where the ambient temperature is "frigid"?

The purpose of this project is to see what kind of material has a higher coefficient of friction, and therefore better grip, no? If you are wearing a shoe out and about, the shoe is going to be at about the temperature of what the air is around it (assuming you've been, say, outside long enough, or wherever you need to be to get the variable conditions you're testing).

Otherwise, it seems like you're doing alright, especially for an 8th grade science fair project. If you would, respond and we can take it from there.

Sorry for delay, I tend to post while at work, and if we get busy, I just don't have time to respond.
 
  • #27
haruspex
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More thoughts... If carrying out the project with a practical end in sight, the important question is how the materials behave in adverse conditions: icy, wet. Also, the coefficient of friction depends on both surfaces, so you should should choose the ramp material appropriately. Maybe it's too late for such comments to be of use.
 
  • #28
1: The duel ranged force sensor attaches to a lab quest and basically it's a machine with a hook and I attach it to a shoe start a test and drag the shoe and the duel ranged force sensor records the data on the lab quest of the force of friction
2: I think it would be awesome to do it that way but I don't have a place to do that in I just put the shoes in a freezer. I would like to do it that way but I have no means of places to do it. The only place I could do 150 degree room is at Goodyear hq which would be hard to get to and to let them to use their room. Freezer wise i have no idea where I would go
3:Yes I am checking for grip (static friction) in the different temperatures. The way I did it was to put the shoe on the ground and perform the test as soon as it left the different temperature area.
4: It is a bit late to do anymore testing. I was borrowing the materials from the high school over break. There isn't a way I'd be able to get the stuff now and everything is due next month. I'm ahead of schedule so I could get as much help as I can with the results
 
  • #29
BiGyElLoWhAt
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how many runs did you do for each?

**
Also, would you care to describe how you measured the normal force?

Was the surface pretty much flat and horizontal?
 
Last edited:
  • #30
how many runs did you do for each?

**
Also, would you care to describe how you measured the normal force?

Was the surface pretty much flat and horizontal?
I did 3 runs for each shoe in each location and took the average for the force of friction and I did it on flat, horizontal cement floor
 
  • #31
BiGyElLoWhAt
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Ok, do you still have the data? It's generally good practice to present more data rather than less (to an extent). So for the representation of the data, I would take the average, and draw a graph with that, but then plot your actual points on the same graph.

And the normal force measurement?
 
  • #32
I only have the data for fridge and oven not freezer or room so i decided not to present it. And no i was testing frictional force. The labquest would look at frictional force and i would divide the static frictional force divided by the normal force (weight from the labquest reading) to get the coefficient of static friction.
 
  • #33
BiGyElLoWhAt
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Ok then. I would just suggest that you be more descriptive when you present your data. Explain how you actually took each measurement.

If I were a judge, I would be pretty impressed if a presentation actually described how the equipment worked. That being said, it sounds like this force meter you're using probably has a spring in it, attached to the hook, does it? Is that important to how the device works?
Make sure you talk about discrepancies. Was your hypothesis correct? If it wasn't, why do you think that is?
 
  • #34
That sounds like a good idea Ill find out and get back to you. But I still have minimal about the conclusion. I was thinking on of the conclusions could be that the mesh/rubber stuff (not sure what is called but will try to find out) is the worst out of all the shoes and isn't a good shoe for friction. I could also say how all the shoes seemed to perform better in room temperature and colder areas than the hotter areas. They all performed badly in the hot areas. Any other ideas on that? To present all my data would it be better to show it in bar graphs or graphs like I showed you guys. Like graphs that are like a bar graph for the fridge,freezer,oven,room temperature and then bar graphs for each individual shoe?
 
  • #35
BiGyElLoWhAt
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I would present the data as you gathered it. You didn't check the shoes in hot or cold areas. You checked hot and cold shoes in room temperature, so heating/cooling the material the shoe is made of seems to make an impact on the coefficient of friction. One descrepency with that though, you tested room temperature shoes in room tempurature, and they did relatively well; however, you tested hot shoes and cold shoes in room temperature as well. Do you think it would make a difference if the surface (i.e. environment) was at the same temperature as the shoe? If so you might want to say that.

Bar graphs are easier when you have a lot of data, which you don't have. That being said, in my opinion, it doesn't really matter how you present it. You have a small enough amount of data that it shouldn't make to much of a difference. Either way, I would make sure to plot ALL the data, as well as the average (which is all you gave us) and make sure they know that it's not a trial value, but the average.
 

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