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Shooting coyotes

  1. Jul 30, 2011 #1

    Math Is Hard

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    I have mixed feeling about this. Little dogs and their owners have been attacked by coyotes while going out for walks, and that's sad. But if you own small pets, shouldn't you choose not to live in coyote territory? The coyotes are just trying to feed themselves and their pups.

    http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lan...oks-shooting-of-coyotes-by-professionals.html
     
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  3. Jul 30, 2011 #2
    Growing up, we had a few hundred acre property in the boonies which we used for deer hunting, snowmobiling and just generally getting away. We had 2 buildings in the middle of the property, and whenever I was at the property by myself (or with friends - being 16-17 at the time) we had blanket instructions to shoot Coyotes that approached the cabins (and this mentality was encouraged by the local conservation officers - one of which was a family friend whom hunted on our property). Now, we knew there was a few dens around - we could hear them often, but allowing them to interact with human influence regularly was a nono.

    Bears, in the same situation, we were told explicitly not to shoot (we had bears at our house in a subdivision once in a while - they loved to tear apart grills it seemed). Just leave them be. Our family friend, the conservation officer, explained that Coyotes tend to be a little more resident when they find sustinance. Bears are transient (there were ~12 tracked bears in a 4 county area). So if a Coyote finds something of interest - likely it's going to come back to that same spot. Bears get bored quick and just keep going.

    Point being - if coyotes find some place they like, and get rewarded for being in that area (with food being man-scraps or a poodle), then they're likely to stay/come back to the same spot. It's unfortunate for the coyotes if they come to like a populated area, but they're scavangers and are in no danger of becoming extinct (as far as I know). They're not going to move away on their own.
     
  4. Jul 30, 2011 #3
    Coyotes are plentiful. As do all animals who compete with one another for scarce resources, coyotes and man will adjust their territories in a natural fashion. I have no problem with shooting them if they're encroaching on human populations, but I'm would not support hunting parties to thin their numbers beyond human areas.
     
  5. Jul 30, 2011 #4

    Evo

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    That's so sad. If there are coyotes in your area, keep your pets safe.
     
  6. Jul 30, 2011 #5
    And Nazis were just trying to make the world a better place for Aryans.

    I think that if a coyote attacks, or is visibly stalking, your little toy poodle, then you have the right to kill it.

    But there's a less messy solution. Just get a big, and preferably ill-tempered, dog that you can walk with the little one. That, along with carrying a shotgun for insurance, should be an effective deterrent to coyote attacks.
     
  7. Jul 30, 2011 #6

    Ryan_m_b

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    That's nearly the fastest fulfilment of Godwin's law I've seen outside of youtube. Giving people the right to walk around with guns and shoot wildlife is not a good idea, if there is a big problem with wild animals in an area they should be professionally culled under an official order.

    Here in England fox hunting got banned a few years ago. One of the worst parts about it in my opinion was how hunters would claim that they need to do it to protect farm animals before charging off with their dogs and wiping the foxes blood on each others cheeks. There are ways of doing things without enabling an avenue for animal cruelty.
     
  8. Jul 30, 2011 #7
    I think the setting is a big factor. It's much more appropriate to have a sidearm when in the middle of a forest or rural area than when walking downtown of a metro area. There are legitimate natural predators out there which warrant firearm use in the wild. I never go camping without a pistol (my wife thinks I'm paranoid), it's just not safe - in the plains states there are boars and in the great lakes areas there are wolves and bears. I've never had to use it, but I think it's good insurance in that setting. Not to mention the possible human predator.

    In a city setting, however, I think it's far more appropriate to call the authorities. We've had coyote and rattlesnake run-ins at my dad's place in the mountains near Scottsdale, AZ - call the animal control and they come take care of them.
     
  9. Jul 30, 2011 #8

    Ryan_m_b

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    Yes obviously it depends, thanks to the Romans there haven't been any predators in England for thousands of years. But I still don't think animal control should be left in the hands of the public, not because I'm a statist or anything but because I think there should be proper regulation and accountability. I've met some pretty cruel people before who think that it should be their god given right to go around slaughtering wild life at will. I'd hate to think what would happen if those same people were legitimately allowed to walk around armed.
     
  10. Jul 30, 2011 #9

    dlgoff

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    You might be interested in reading some Kansas History about this.

    http://www.kshs.org/publicat/history/1997autumn_antle.pdf" [Broken]

    Here's a picture I snipped from the pdf.

    attachment.php?attachmentid=37651&stc=1&d=1312057413.jpg
     

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  11. Jul 30, 2011 #10

    dlgoff

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    Oh I've got them. So Roger, Henrietta, and Guinevere also. :wink:
     
  12. Jul 30, 2011 #11

    Evo

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    How *are* my babies?
     
  13. Jul 30, 2011 #12
    It's one of my new hobbies. I'm retired.

    Unless the wildlife happens to be injuring you and killing your pets?

    Culling wouldn't necessarily solve the problem. Coyotes attack smaller animals (like tiny domesticated dogs) because they're easy targets. It seems quite reasonable to me that if a coyote is killing your little dog, then you have the right to kill the coyote.

    I agree. Hence my suggestion to owners of tiny dogs to also get at least one big, and preferably ill-tempered, dog to walk along with the little one. A deterrent. Problem solved. The shotgun would only be for insurance in case a coyote attacks anyway, or if somebody really pisses you off.
     
  14. Jul 30, 2011 #13

    Ryan_m_b

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    No doubt if my pet was being attacked and I had a gun I wouldn't hesitate to pull the trigger. The problem is that people will pursue pre-emptive shootings.
     
  15. Jul 30, 2011 #14

    dlgoff

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    They are living a life of luxury. Cool shady home with large safe patio and a butler that hand selects fresh greens daily to go along with their Nutrena delicacies. Oh, and they love to be talked to; which I do also.
     
  16. Jul 30, 2011 #15
    Another possibility, instead of or in addition to big dogs and shotguns, is to take some raw meat (assuming coyotes prefer raw to cooked) with you when walking the dog. Feed the coyote. Everybody's happy.
     
  17. Jul 30, 2011 #16
    Those sorts of people are going to do that sort of thing no matter what.
     
  18. Jul 30, 2011 #17

    Ryan_m_b

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    Yes but if it's outlawed at least you can do something about it.
     
  19. Jul 30, 2011 #18
    Point taken.
     
  20. Jul 30, 2011 #19
    Killing coyotes is pretty much encouraged in much of the US. They will drag off a human child if they think they can get away with it. They will never be extinct anymore than cockroaches could be.

    Never feed coyotes! LOL!
     
  21. Jul 30, 2011 #20

    turbo

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    When I lived on wooded farm-land on a rural hill-top. I'd gut and skin steers for my (much) older neighbor, and we'd both gut and skin deer that we shot. We'd collect the guts, etc, and pile them up on the end of his lower field, to lure in coyotes, and he would watch the gut-piles with his Winchester .30-06 bolt-action in hand. He had lots of adult grand-children and his primary concern was the protection of fawns from predation, so the deer herd could grow and his extended family would have a fair chance of shooting some deer.
     
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