Shot Noise in Double-Quantum dots

In summary, shot noise calculations can provide insight into the tunnel times in double quantum dots, and there are several numerical methods and MATLAB codes available for this purpose. It is recommended to consult other papers for a more rigorous derivation of the shot noise formula.
  • #1
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Hello all,

So I am working on a problem where I need to characterize the shot noise in double quantum dots. My professor suggested to me that we can estimate the tunnel times from shot noise calculations. Can anyone give me any insight into this?

Moreover, can anyone provide me any numerical calculations/code(preferably MATLAB) on shot noise calculation in mesoscopic systems specially quantum dots. I am following this wonderful paper - http://journals.aps.org/prb/pdf/10.1103/PhysRevB.47.1967

But the numerical calculations for calculation zero frequency shot noise seem a bit dubious to me. Specially the derivation of equation A3 in appendix on page 1977. If somebody can provide an insight/relevant papers into this that would be really helpful.

Thank you
 
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  • #2
for your post and for sharing your research problem with us. As a scientist familiar with quantum dots and shot noise, I can provide some insight into your questions.

Firstly, your professor is correct in suggesting that tunnel times can be estimated from shot noise calculations. Shot noise is a measure of the statistical fluctuations in the current flowing through a system, and it can reveal information about the dynamics of the system. In the case of double quantum dots, the tunneling of electrons between the dots can contribute to shot noise, and by analyzing the shot noise, we can estimate the tunnel times.

In terms of numerical calculations, there are several methods that can be used to calculate shot noise in mesoscopic systems, including quantum master equations and Monte Carlo simulations. In terms of MATLAB code, there are several open-source codes available online that can be used for shot noise calculations in quantum dots, such as the Kwant and QuTiP packages. These packages also have documentation and examples that can help you with your calculations.

Regarding the paper you mentioned, I am familiar with it and I agree that the derivation of equation A3 in the appendix may seem a bit dubious. I would recommend consulting other papers on shot noise in quantum dots, such as "Shot noise in mesoscopic conductors" by Blanter and Büttiker, which provide a more detailed and rigorous derivation of the shot noise formula.

I hope this information helps you with your research. Good luck with your calculations and please feel free to reach out if you have any further questions.
 

1. What is shot noise in double-quantum dots?

Shot noise in double-quantum dots refers to the random fluctuations in the electrical current that occur due to the discrete and random nature of electrons passing through the quantum dots.

2. How does shot noise affect the performance of double-quantum dot devices?

Shot noise can have a significant impact on the performance of double-quantum dot devices, as it can introduce unpredictable variations in the current and limit the accuracy and precision of measurements.

3. What factors contribute to shot noise in double-quantum dots?

The main factors that contribute to shot noise in double-quantum dots include the discrete nature of electrons, the random arrival times of electrons, and the interactions between electrons in the quantum dots.

4. How is shot noise measured in double-quantum dot experiments?

Shot noise can be measured by analyzing the power spectrum of the electrical current in the double-quantum dot device. This power spectrum shows the amount of noise present at different frequencies, with shot noise appearing as a characteristic peak.

5. Can shot noise be reduced in double-quantum dot devices?

While shot noise cannot be completely eliminated, it can be reduced by optimizing the design and fabrication of the double-quantum dot device. This includes minimizing the number of defects and imperfections in the device and carefully controlling the operating conditions.

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